Vintage Pulp Sep 4 2017
We guarantee this won't be the last Waltz.

This Technicolor lithograph doesn't have the blank advertising banner at top the way our many other examples do, but it's the same idea, manufactured by Copr. C. Moss and titled “Rhapsody in Red.” This was a particularly popular image, and it was picked up by more than one company. While the above version is from C. Moss, we've also seen a version from the mid-1950s manufactured by J.S.J. and titled “Sandra.” But the model is not Sandra—she's Playboy centerfold Margaret Scott, who was also known as Marilyn Waltz, and that fact goes a long way toward explaining why this image became so popular.

Scott/Waltz posed for the C. Moss shot in 1950 when she was nineteen but didn't hit Playboy's pages until 1954, when she was the centerspread for April. The magazine then brought her back as a playmate in April 1955, so obviously Hefner loved her. After either the first or second Playboy appearance, we suspect the enterprising owner of the 1950 negative recognized her and decided to sell her image for a fresh run as a lithograph. J.S.J. stepped up, bought the neg, and called her Sandra. This is an amazing image. Waltz has another litho we haven't shared yet, but we'll get around to that at some point. Bonus shots below. Click her keywords and you'll see our other posts on her.


Femmes Fatales Aug 8 2016
Similar to the Tennessee Waltz but with less clothing.

We showed you Wisconsin born model and Playboy playmate Marilyn Waltz not long ago on one of the Technicolor lithographs we've been featuring the last couple of years, but some celebs deserve return engagements, so here she is again, pre-Playboy and pre-blonde, looking very girl-next-door. Waltz was one of Playboy's most popular playmates of the 1950s, appearing in the centerfold three times, twice under the name Waltz, and once as Margaret Scott. We're guessing this photo was made around 1953.


Vintage Pulp Mar 18 2016
She's enough to make your head spin.

This Technicolor lithograph of a model in boldly checked pants stars Marilyn Waltz, who under that name was Playboy magazine's April 1955 centerfold, but also modeled as Margaret Scott. This print is the actual centerfold shot but slightly cropped. It's titled “A Sultry Miss” and appeared later than the magazine, we think. Probably around 1958.


Femmes Fatales Jul 29 2013
I’ll be so famous people will completely forget about that other Marilyn. Just wait and see.

When you hear the phrase “Marilyn Walk” you probably associate it with Marilyn Monroe’s distinctive sashay. That’s a fine image, but if your name happens literally to be Marilyn Walk then that means you went down in Hollywood history unremembered. We like to imagine Walk dreaming of catching her first big break and seeing an article about herself entitled “Walk of Fame.” It doesn’t seem as if that happened, but this shot by renowned lensman Bruno Bernard, aka Bernard of Hollywood, bestows a sort of fame upon Walk all by itself by making her image a rare collectible. It was probably made around 1955. And just in case you think we’re making up her name, the reverse of the photo appears below. 

Update: We now think this is Playboy model Marilyn Waltz. The look is right, the time is right, and the name is close. She was probably trying out a pseudonym to dissociate herself from her centerfold appearances, which spanned February 1954 to April 1955. We're 95% on this.


History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
March 18
1906—First Airplane Flight in Europe
Romanian designer Traian Vuia flies twelve meters outside Paris in a self-propelled airplane, taking off without the aid of tractors or cables, and thus becomes the first person to fly a self-propelled, heavier-than-air aircraft. Because his craft was not a glider, and did not need to be pulled, catapulted or otherwise assisted, it is considered by some historians to be the first true airplane.
1965—Leonov Walks in Space
Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov leaves his spacecraft the Voskhod 2 for twelve minutes. At the end of that time Leonov's spacesuit had inflated in the vacuum of space to the point where he could not re-enter Voskhod's airlock. He opened a valve to allow some of the suit's pressure to bleed off, was barely able to get back inside the capsule, and in so doing became the first person to complete a spacewalk.
March 17
1966—Missing Nuke Found
Off the coast of Spain in the Mediterranean, the deep submergence vehicle Alvin locates a missing American hydrogen bomb. The 1.45-megaton nuke had been lost by the U.S. Air Force during a midair accident over Palomares, Spain. It was found resting in nearly three-thousand feet of water and was raised intact on 7 April.
March 16
1968—My Lai Massacre Occurs
In Vietnam, American troops kill between 350 and 500 unarmed citizens, all of whom are civilians and a majority of whom are women, children, babies and elderly people. Many victims are sexually abused, beaten, tortured, and some of the bodies are mutilated. The incident doesn't become public knowledge until 1969, but when it does, the American war effort is dealt one of its worst blows.
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