Vintage Pulp Feb 3 2013
ROCK OF THE BAY
Sittin’ in the morning sun, she’ll be sittin’ when the evening comes.


For the first time the Goodtime Weekly Calendar of 1963 presents us with an image that isn’t pure cheesecake. This shot of an unknown model by a photographer credited only as Mills would be right at home in a fashion magazine. Perhaps it’s fitting that she’s making a fashion statement by wearing Nehru jacket, am Indian formal garment that became popular in the West after being adopted by famous performers like Sammy Davis, Jr., the Beatles, and the Monkees. The jacket also made an appearance in the first James Bond film Dr. No, worn by the villain Julius No, and also by Sean Connery himself at one point. All that said, it also could be a chef’s jacket. We have no idea, truthfully. We just know the model looks smoking hot in it. The quips this week include two each from Freddie Flintstone and that mysterious He-who Who-he character, who we think was probably the publisher’s nephew. We have no other way to explain why his musings were ever considered worth printing. Yet we compounded the sin by transcribing his and others below. Enjoy.
 
Feb 3: “Worldwide fame awaits the designer of a girdle that is larger on the inside than on the outside.”—Paul Gibson
 
Feb 4: “The Oriental invented face-saving but it’s American beauticians who make a living out of it.”—He-who Who-he
 
Feb 5: “When a woman tells you she is approaching 30 she forgets to tell you from which direction,”—Freddie Flintstone
 
Feb 6: “Hi-fi was invented by a man listening to his wife on one side and his mother-in-law on the other.”—Tom Poston
 
Feb 7: They called TV a medium because much of it is not rare and certainly not well done.
 
Feb 8: “Rail trouble: With double beds in motels, who wants to squeeze into a sleeping car?”—He-who Who-he
 
Feb 9: “A man can live in a penthouse and still have a wife who makes him feel low.”—Freddie Flintstone

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Vintage Pulp Jan 20 2013
HATS OFF

Here's the latest page from Goodtime Weekly with a shot from Don Ornitz of February 1958 Playboy centerfold Cheryl Kubert. Kubert is a bit of a mystery. Early Playboy centerfolds were pretty demure, and she showed less than normal. She had already appeared in magazines such as Pageant, Gala and Argosy, and after her Playboy appearance was featured in their 1959 calendar, but after that there’s only a bit appearance in the movie Pal Joey, and a bit part in 1980’s Smokey and the Judge. She died in 1989, supposedly from suicide. The calendar quips are below.

Jan 20: “Many a girl is only as strong as her weakest wink.”—Sam Cowling

Jan 21: “A girl is grown up when she stops counting on her fingers and starts counting on her legs.”—Irv Kupcinet

Jan 22: “A wizard is a man who can describe—without gesture—an accordion or a girl.”—Quin Ryan

Jan 23: “Fashion is what a her does to a hem to get a him.”—Joe Hamilton

Jan 24: “A clever girl is one who knows how to give a man her own way.”—Tom Poston

Jan 25: “The greatest mystery in the world is a woman who is a bachelor.”—Loretta Young

Jan 26: “A confirmed bachelor is a guy who’ll go to a drive-in on a motorcycle.”—Scott Brady

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Vintage Pulp Apr 7 2012
WINE BUFF
Care to join me for a nightcap?

Our fifth installment of the Good Time Weekly Calendar of 1963 features a model that is damnably familiar, but we just can’t come up with her name. We can tell you she was shot by renowned pin-up photog Ron Vogel, if that helps. Love the ornamental wine decanter, by the way. The week’s quips are below, and for a change a couple of them are actually clever.

Apr 7: “Girls who accept rings from men they don’t know are telephone operators.”—Sam Cowling

Apr 8: Why girls kiss and make up? Because the stuff rubs off.

Apr 9: Think now or pay later: Are your in-laws legalized charities?

Apr 10: “It doesn’t take much for a girl to hook a guy: He usually supplies the line himself.”—Tom Poston

Apr 11: “To a smart girl men are no problem—they’re the answer.”—Zsa Zsa Gabor

Apr 12: Three more days to decide either the debt is going to be the U.S.’s or yours.

Apr 13: “He who will gladly listen to both sides of an argument is a neighbor on the party line.”—He-who Who-he 

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Vintage Pulp Oct 18 2011
DEAR ABBY
A change is gonna come.

The mid-century tabloid obsession with transsexuals and gender reassignment continues with this issue of The National Insider published today, 1964. This time the subject is Abby Sinclair, who started life as Alvin Sinclair, but changed her sex and—like Coccinelle and Christine Jorgenson before her—became famous on the exotic dance circuit. Somehow Insider got exclusive rights to Sinclair’s story, and ran it as a serial entitled “I Was Male.” The series was later published as a book.

Sinclair, who sources agree had beautiful results with her reassignment, went on to a dual career as a stripper under the management of famed NYC promoter Bobby Colt, and as a manicurist named Alice at the Stage Barbershop in Manhattan. We found this out from a copy of (don’t laugh) The Beaver County Times from June 1965. Our guess is that the manicurist job was an excuse to get close to New York celebs, since her workplace was the preferred haircut stop for the likes of Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, and Tom Poston.

The Times shares an anecdote about a famous columnist who saw Sinclair at Lou Black's Bellydance Emporium one night and recognized her from the barbershop. He sent a note to her only to be informed by Bobby Colt: "That's not Alice, and it's not a girl. That's a guy named Alvin Sinclair from Brooklyn who had one of those operations." Though it sounds as if Colt was turning his own client into a punchline, he really wasn't—the sex change was Sinclair's calling card, and all of her regulars knew she had been a man. For Colt, the more people who knew the story the better. We found nothing more on Abby Sinclair—her moment in history passed quickly. But life goes on, and wherever she went we suspect hers was always eventful. 

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
October 02
1919—Wilson Suffers Stroke
U.S. President Woodrow Wilson suffers a massive stroke, leaving him partially paralyzed. He is confined to bed for weeks, but eventually resumes his duties, though his participation is little more than perfunctory. Wilson remains disabled throughout the remainder of his term in office, and the rest of his life.
1968—Massacre in Mexico
Ten days before the opening of the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, a peaceful student demonstration ends in the Tlatelolco Massacre. 200 to 300 students are gunned down, and to this day there is no consensus about how or why the shooting began.
October 01
1910—Los Angeles Times Bombed
A massive dynamite bomb destroys the Los Angeles Times building in downtown Los Angeles, California, killing 21 people. Police arrest James B. McNamara and his brother John J. McNamara. Though the brothers are represented by the era's most famous lawyer, Clarence Darrow, of Scopes Monkey Trial fame, they eventually plead guilty. James is convicted and sentenced to fifteen years in prison. His brother John is convicted of a separate bombing of the Llewellyn Iron Works and also sent to prison.
1975—Ali Defeats Frazier in Manila
In the Philippines, an epic heavyweight boxing match known as the Thrilla in Manila takes place between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier. It is the third, final and most brutal match between the two, and Ali wins by TKO in the fourteenth round.
September 30
1955—James Dean Dies in Auto Accident
American actor James Dean, who appeared in the films Giant, East of Eden, and the iconic Rebel without a Cause, dies in an auto accident at age 24 when his Porsche 550 Spyder is hit head-on by a larger Ford coupe. The driver of the Ford had been trying to make a left turn across the rural highway U.S. Route 466 and never saw Dean's small sports car approaching.
1962—Chavez Founds UFW
Mexican-American farm worker César Chávez founds the United Farm Workers in California. His strikes, marches and boycotts eventually result in improved working conditions for manual farm laborers and today his birthday is celebrated as a holiday in eight U.S. states.

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