Vintage Pulp Sep 26 2015
A history of Violenza.

Above, a colorful Japanese poster for Florestano Vancini’s Italian thriller Violenza al sole, aka Blow Hot Blow Cold, the story of a young couple vacationing on an island where they meet an older couple. The older male spies on the young couple during their various romantic interludes, but the reason why he’s doing it, and the movie’s ending, make it a minor classic. With Bibi Andersson, Gunnar Bjornstrand, Rosemarie Dexter, and Guiliano Gemma, very good stuff. Violenza al sole premiered in Italy in August 1969 and made it to Japan today in 1970. 


Vintage Pulp Sep 25 2015
Our theory is this would be an enjoyable movie—if we could find it.

We’ve always called posters of these dimensions “panel-length,” but that’s just our personal lingo—they’re actually “tatekan” posters in the parlance of collectors. This rare tateken for Bankaku Rokku, aka Bankaku Rock, has a washed-out look, but the colors are true. The designers seemed to be shooting for something less garish than the typical Japanese promo (though we love the garish). We couldn’t track down the movie—lot of that going around lately—but we know it’s about a war between two female gangs, the Akabane 100 Club and the Ikebukuro Cavalry, and it focuses mainly on the Akabane 100’s chief badass Yukiko, played by Emiko Yamauchi of Neon Jellyfish fame. Though we didn’t find the film, we did find a bunch of promo shots, which you see below. Bankaku Rokku premiered in Japan today in 1973.


Femmes Fatales Sep 23 2015
The weather is actually close to freezing, but women are tough in that part of the world.

Well, officially summer’s over, though many of us live in parts of the world where the weather will not be changing enough to matter. Sweden certainly isn’t one of those places, though, which is why we’ve chosen Swedish actress Christina Lindberg to mark the day. And if chill weather is creeping up on you like it is on her, take heart—summer will return, and so will she. 


Vintage Pulp Sep 23 2015
Good to the last Droppar.

And speaking of Sweden, the rather bold poster you see here is from Akira Katô’s drama Mitsu no shitatari, which was also known by the Swedish title Droppar av honung, which seems to mean “honey dripper.” Swedish title notwithstanding, this was a Japanese production all the way. Nikkatsu had a series of Suwêden poruno flicks it released during the early 1970s—Japanese backing, Western stars, and those oh so clever softcore production values that pushed the envelope while showing nothing that could result in obscenity charges. This one starred Solveig Andersson, who was one of Sweden’s other cinematic sex symbols after Christina Lindberg, and who starred with Lindberg in Thriller—en grym film, aka Thriller: A Cruel Picture. Andersson had a more extensive career than her compatriot, though, and even appeared onscreen as recently as 2014. She acted here under her phonetic Japanese name Sorubei Andâshon. We were not able to track the movie down, sadly, but is there any need? You can tell how it goes. Mitsu no shitatari premiered in Japan yesterday in 1973. 


Vintage Pulp Sep 19 2015
It’s always best to let sleeping corpses lie.

It’s a Dino de Laurentiis production, so you know it’s going to be bad. Filmed in black and white, Cadavere per signora, aka Corpse for a Lady deals with a wealthy woman, played by the transcendent Sylva Koscina, who is blackmailed and calls her three childhood friends for help. The four of them arrange a deal with the blackmailer, but he ends up dead and they’re stuck with the body. Hilarity ensues as they try to get rid of it. Not recommendable, but we love the poster. Cadavere per signora premiered in Italy today in 1964. 


Vintage Pulp Sep 19 2015
The bodies are really starting to pile up today.

Just because we can, here’s another movie poster, this one for Karin: un corpo che brucia, which means “Karin: A body that burns.” They have a different type of body in mind than the makers of Cadavere per signora, but we’re calling this a theme anyway. The English title of the movie was Playmates, and the original French title was Le bal des voyous, which means “the ball of thugs” —ball like a dance. Sounds like an occasion to be avoided, save for the fact that it has Linda Veras and ex-Playboy playmate Donna Michelle, both below. They star with Jean-Claude Bercq and Henri Verdier, and the year was 1968.


Vintage Pulp Sep 19 2015
The magazine that cried wolf.

For Men Only was launched in New York City by Canam Publishers Sales Corp., but changed ownership several times over the years, and was even acquired at one point by pulp kingpin Martin Goodman. This particular issue is from September 1956 and contains art from Rudolph Belarski, Frank Cozzarrelli, Elliot Means, Ben Thomas, Victor Olson, and Ken Crook. Actually, it’s a miracle all the art is credited. It doesn’t happen as often as it should in these magazines. The stories accompanying those art pieces range from espionage to wilderness adventure, including non-fiction from Jim Thompson about “America’s first murderer,” a man named John Billington who came to the New World on the Mayflower. After making trouble for years in Plymouth Colony, he was finally hanged for the slaying of John Newcomen. We checked, and Billington did in fact exist. His execution in September 1630 was the first of a colonist—but certainly not the last.

And another story caught our eye. It discusses an incident on the set of an Italian movie in which a wolf got loose and tried to attack actress Silvana Mangano. According to For Men Only, co-star Guido Celano rushed the wolf, grabbed it and threw it into the air, whereupon a rifle-toting crew member nailed it like he was skeet shooting. We’re calling bullshit on that one. A while back we wrote an article about guaranteed hunt farms and were able to see some rescued gray wolves up close. They’re big—about three feet high at the shoulder. European wolves are even bigger. No movie production would use one. Also, we don’t picture fifty-two-year-old, five foot three Guido Celano heaving a wolf into the air like a sack of laundry. No, it was just a dog—a German Shepherd, looks like. But it’s a good story, appropriate publicity for a movie—Uomini e lupi, aka Men and Wolves—that was still months from its premiere. We have about twenty scans below and an inexhaustible supply of magazines still to share.


Modern Pulp Sep 15 2015
1982 vision of a wrecked future gets better with time.

Did we already mention that the Blade Runner sequel will suck? We did, we think, and then expounded upon Ridley Scott’s fiasco Prometheus. But Blade Runner is an undisputed classic, one of our favorite films, part of a top ten that includes for us Casablanca, Chinatown, Altered States (and a few non-pulp movies such as Dazed and Confused). It’s worth noting that the movie wasn’t well reviewed upon release. Critics have slowly upgraded their opinions over time to the point where Blade Runner now has one of the highest ratings you’ll find. The upgrades are nice, but it’s kind of funny how far over critics’ heads the movie went at the time. It premiered in June 1982, and first showed in France today the same year. The French promo poster isn’t wonderful, and that’s why we have a collection of stills below to celebrate the watershed event of Blade Runner’s creation. These augment the promos we’ve already shared here, and here. Now let’s just hope they scrap that sequel. 


Vintage Pulp Sep 13 2015
Making the world a safer place one skewered man at a time.

Above and below you see some Yugoslavian promo cards for Opasnije od muškaraca, aka Deadlier Than the Male, a film we’ve talked about a few times before. The text is in Serbian, and you’ll notice it describes the movie as “Američki." Actually, it was British. But Brits, Americans, who can tell them apart, really? We imagine the Yugoslavian distributors of the film knew quite well it came from Britain-based Greater Films Ltd., but that they labeled it Američki to make it more marketable. As if Elke Sommer and Sylva Koscina aren’t sufficient. See more from the film here.


Vintage Pulp Sep 11 2015
Who says Italians are great lovers?

Io, Emmanuelle, aka A Man for Emmanuelle, was the movie that unveiled the immortal character of Emmanuelle to cinema audiences, but the film isn’t actually based on anything written by Emmanuelle Arsan.  Instead its source is Graziella Di Prospero’s spin-off tale “Disintegrazione 68,” a title that describes the film better than any summation we can offer. This is a brooding and stylish study of a sexually unfulfilled woman played by Erika Blanc wandering around wintry Rome from encounter to encounter, seeking but never finding satisfaction. Dark stuff, but pretty cool. Io, Emmanuelle premiered in Italy today in 1969.


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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
October 10
1971—London Bridge Goes Up
After being sold, dismantled and moved to the United States, London Bridge reopens in the resort town of Lake Havasu City, Arizona.
1975—Burton and Taylor Marry Again
British actor Richard Burton and American screen star Elizabeth Taylor secretly remarry sixteen months after their divorce, then jet away to a second honeymoon in Chobe Game Park in Botswana.
October 09
1967—Ché Executed in Bolivia
A day after being captured, Marxist revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara is executed in Bolivia. In an attempt to make it appear as though he had been killed resisting Bolivian troops, the executioner shoots Guevara with a machine gun, wounding him nine times in the legs, arm, shoulder, throat, and chest.
October 08
1918—Sgt. York Becomes a Hero
During World War I, in the Argonne Forest in France, America Corporal Alvin C. York leads an attack on a German machine gun nest that kills 25 and captures 132. He is a corporal during the event, but is promoted to sergeant as a result. He also earns Medal of Honor from the U.S., the Croix de Guerre from the French Republic, and the Croce di Guerra from Italy and Montenegro. Stateside, he is celebrated as a hero, and Hollywood even makes a movie entitled Sergeant York, starring Gary Cooper.
1956—Larsen Pitches Perfect Game
The New York Yankees' Don Larsen pitches a perfect game in the World Series against hated rivals the Brooklyn Dodgers. It is the only perfect game in World Series history, as well as the only no-hitter.

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