Femmes Fatales Dec 12 2014
WORRY DOLL
Photo sessions make me nervous and then I look uneasy or stressed, so please wait until I’m smiling before you—

Actually, American actress Gladys George did tend to look worried in many of her photos. Not her fault—it’s just the way her face was built. But she coincidentally suffered from numerous worrisome ailments during her life, including throat cancer, heart disease, and cirrhosis. You may remember her as Iva Archer in the classic noir The Maltese Falcon, but she also appeared in Madame X, They Gave Him a Gun, and The House that Jazz Built, among more than forty other films. She eventually died early from a cerebral hemorrhage. 
 
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Femmes Fatales Dec 9 2014
WONDER BAR
Wow, you’re blurrier and taller than you were earlier this evening.

French actress Nathalie Delon was born in Oudja, Morocco as Francine Canovas, during the period when the North African country was occupied by France. She appeared in more than thirty films, including Bluebeard, Sex Shop, and Un sussurro nel buio, aka A Whisper in the Dark, and she also wrote, directed, and recorded music. We love this photo because not only was it shot in the world’s swankiest bar, but because it looks like it was photographed from the perspective of someone who got drunk and fell off his stool. No beer goggles here, though—Delon is a celebrated beauty. The shot is from 1977. 

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Vintage Pulp Dec 6 2014
RAVE REVUE
Sex and cinema in an open age.


When we went to Paris a couple of months ago we mentioned that we found a stack of Ciné-Revue magazines in Le Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen. Their dimensions make for extra work because we have to scan every page in two pieces and put them together in Photoshop, and even more daunting, any two-page spreads have to be scanned in four pieces and assembled (this is actually true for all the tabloids we post). That’s why we get a bit lazy about it sometimes. Yeah, yeah, we know—get a bigger scanner. Easier said than done, unless someone wants to mail us one. Anyway, we managed to get some pages together from the above issue of Ciné-Revue published today in 1973.

Ciné-Revue originated out of Belgium in 1944 and was the premiere French-language cinema magazine there and in France for many years. Today it remains popular, making it one of the longest-lived cinema magazines as well. On the cover of this one you get German softcore and hardcore actress Karin Schubert, and inside you get John Wayne, Pia Giancaro, Brigitte Bardot, Jean Gabin, and an artful nude shot of impossibly handsome Austrian actor Helmut Berger. You’re welcome, girls, but please don’t start doing internet searches trying to find out what he looks like now—you won’t be happy. Berger also appears on the back of the mag.
 
Regarding the Schubert cover, the line between mainstream cinema and porn was never blurrier than back then, and Ciné-Revue reflected that with its features of hardcore and softcore performers. Could you imagine porn actresses routinely appearing in, say, Rolling Stone, and being given equal standing with mainstreamers? Nevertheless, popular American media is heavily porn-influenced, even if the seed, so to speak, goes unacknowledged. What is a Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue about, for example, with its models wearing not swimsuits, but rather paint on their fully waxed bodies?
 
When cinema first developed into an industry many filmmakers thought of movies as simply a motile version of photography, or painting, or sculpture. Nudity was a regular occurrence onscreen during the pre-code 1920s, but a funny thing happens when you add motion and character development to the static nude—Michelangelo turns into Brazzers. Today, all nudity in American cinema is on some level political. No? Then why is it that only in American cinema there is such a proclivity for the clothed sex scene? It raises a question. Is it possible for both men and women, gay and straight, to celebrate their sexuality without conflict? Maybe, but only with more economic equality for women, less stigmitization of homosexuality, less racism, and more understanding that we are—male and female, gay and straight, green and purple—biologically driven by sexual desire.
 
Looking at the Schubert image above, we’re reminded of a time (in which we were basically zygotes, but go with us here) during which mainstream movies asked questions about freedom for versus exploitation of women, and how commerce in an age of mass media impacts women’s security versus the ideal of sexual freedom. For instance, how do we have sex and sexual aspiration but also have a safe pressure release for the millions who aren’t having sex in any given week or year? Can sex and porn safely co-exist? No idea. Option two is to beat the need for sex out of every man and woman on the planet. Not our preferred solution, but we can talk about it. Why did we write all this? Probably because there’s nudity/exploitation in the next two posts, so these questions just came into our minds.
 
On another note, we had to go back to France on short notice, but to Bordeaux this time, and we’re there at this moment. So maybe hanging out with the always philosophical French made us write this missive. Possibly some fine red wine has contributed. Anyway, we will scour Bordeaux for more wine—er, pulp—but especially Ciné-Revue, as we’re very interested in 1970s international movie stars, and this magazine gave them as much exposure as any publication we’ve seen. We have eighteen scans below, and more from Ciné-Revue to come.


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Vintage Pulp Dec 6 2014
GOING FOR THE THROAT
Toei Co. tries to copy the success of Deep Throat and ends up with something not deep and not tasteful.


You know that we’re sticklers about sharing art on its premiere date. Just by coincidence we had two tabloids published today, which we’ve shared above, and we also have movie promo art. This all makes for a very naked day on Pulp Intl., but that’s the way it happens sometimes. We take no responsibility—this is the smut of previous generations, not ours, so blame your grandpa. Anyway, the above poster is for Toei Studios’ Tôkyô dîpu surôto fujin, aka Tokyo Deep Throat, aka Deep Throat in Tokyo. This is a non-pornographic film because, as we’ve mentioned many times before, such acts were illegal to show in Japan at the time, so what you have here is really a pinku or softcore flick with a lot of suggestive action—such as star Kumi Taguchi tonguing a mango, as seen on the poster art—but no actual sex.

The plot is similar to the real Deep Throat in that a woman has a clitoris in her throat. How did it get there? Well, her husband had her undergo implantation surgery after she refused to give him a hummer. We know. She won’t go down on him, but somehow he’s able to make her go under the knife. Whatever. After the surgery oral sex is equally pleasurable for both of them, though she seems to have lost her voice, and what happens is… zzzzzzzzz. Where were we? What time is it? Oh yes—plot. Taguchi can now orgasm by eating a bananathat’s not a euphemism, as she does exactly that twice—and there’s some mobster stuff and a murder that really isn’t. But none of it matters. Just know that with a disastrously crappy transfer from the original print, production values here are so low you’ll feel like you’re in a sleazy, mid-disco era Kabukicho wankhouse. Not that we’d know. Tôkyô dîpu surôto fujin premiered in Japan today in 1975.


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Femmes Fatales Dec 4 2014
HOLY FOCH
Thou shalt not mispronounce her name.

When your name is Nina Foch you probably get used to introducing yourself only to have people say, “You need a what?” Not us, though. We’d never be that juvenile. Film buffs will remember this Dutch actress as Bithiah, the woman who in 1956’s oft-broadcast spectacle The Ten Commandments finds Moses and raises him as her son, but she also played in pulpier fare such as The Return of the Vampire and Escape in the Fog, and important noirs like Johnny O’Clock and My Name Is Julia Ross. This shot was made in 1944 as a promo for her role in Cry of the Werewolf.

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Musiquarium Dec 2 2014
L'GRECO
La Muse de l’existentialisme et Miles.

This striking promo art for French singer Juliette Gréco and Disques Fontana (a subsidiary of the Dutch label Philips Records) was created by the famous illustrator O’Kley in 1956. The art was reused for record covers, as you see below. Gréco, an actress as well as singer, was a fixture in the Saint-Germain-des-Prés area of Paris, and her acquaintanceships with such figures as Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty earned her the nickname La Muse de l’existentialisme—the existentialists’ muse. She was also, according to Miles Davis, one of the great loves of his life, and the feeling was reciprocated, so that wins major points right there because Miles was the bomb.

Moving on to the art, O’Kley was a pseudonym for Nantes-born Pierre Gilardeau, the man behind some of the most collectable Folies Bergère posters. He also illustrated many book covers and movie posters, and after a long career just died in 2007. We’ve tracked down some good examples of his art and we’ll get back to him a bit later. You can see another Fontana post here.

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Vintage Pulp Nov 29 2014
ONCE IN A LIFETIME OFFER
She wouldn’t have to ask us twice.

How about we share something truly rare and amazing? Here you see the front of a Japanese promotional pamphlet for Marilyn Monroe’s 1960 movie Let’s Make Love. This is exactly how we react, by the way, when our girlfriends say the same to us. 

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Vintage Pulp Nov 29 2014
WIFE IN THE FAST LANE
Woman on the Run is a real rollercoaster ride.

General consensus on this public domain film is that it’s better than expected and we watched it and agree. It isn’t about a woman on the run but rather the woman’s husband. She’s looking for him, though, and that’s what the movie revolves around. There’s a very effective rollercoaster sequence at the climax, but otherwise the movie has two main pleasures—Ann Sheridan’s jaded wife character that softens by the end of the film, and the extensive location shooting. In fact, there’s so much external scenery that the film doubles as a tour of mid-century San Francisco, which might be enough reason alone to watch it. It premiered in the U.S. today in 1950.

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Femmes Fatales Nov 29 2014
BATHTUB TIME MACHINE
What happened? How did I get here? Just seconds ago I was in the year 2014.

This image shows Finnish-born Taina Elg, dancer, actress, and multiple Golden Globe winner, who has been a significant presence on telelvsion for many years and whose most noted movie role probably was in the thriller The 39 Steps. This shot was made in 1958.

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Modern Pulp Nov 27 2014
TOKYOSCOPE POP
2010 lecture and film series produced uniquely stylish art.

Modern art with a vintage flair always catches our eye. The posters above and below promote a lecture and film series called TokyoScope Talks, which were held in San Francisco during 2010 at the subterranean Viz Cinema in Japantown. The cinema has since closed, and the lecture/film series has concluded, but the art is so interesting we wanted to share it anyway, even fours years late. These events were primarily organized by writer/journalist Patrick Macias, and the posters were put together by the talented Kazumi Nonaka.

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
December 26
1919—Ruth Goes to Yankees
Boston Red Sox pitching star Babe Ruth is sold to the New York Yankees by owner Harry Frazee. After moving to the Yankees, Ruth's transition from a pitcher to a power-hitting outfielder becomes complete. In his fifteen year Yankee career, consisting of over 2,000 games, Ruth rewrites the record books in terms of his hitting achievements, while making only five widely-scattered token appearances on the mound, winning all of them.
December 25
1946—W.C. Fields Dies
American vaudevillian and film star W. C. Fields, whose renowned hard-drinking, misanthropic persona was only partly an act, dies from a stomach hemorrhage in a Pasadena, California hospital.
1977—Charlie Chaplin Dies
British comedian, actor, and director Charlie Chaplin, who at the height of his fame had been targeted by reactionary commie-hunter Joseph McCarthy and FBI head J. Edgar Hoover, with the result of forcing him out of Hollywood, dies in his sleep in Vevey, Switzerland.
December 24
1968—Apollo 8 Orbits Moon
The crew of Apollo 8 enters into orbit around the Moon, becoming the first humans to do so. They perform 10 lunar orbits and broadcast live TV pictures that become known as the Christmas Eve Broadcast, one of the most watched programs in history.

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