Femmes Fatales Feb 15 2018
The public adored watching her. And she adored watching quite a few of them too.

Diana Dors was marketed as Britain's answer to Marilyn Monroe. It was probably an unfair comparison, because Monroe was a unique talent. Dors was talented in her own right, but her time in show business was turbulent. There were brawls, a divorce, reporters who broke into her home, the loss of a studio contract due to a morality clause, and eventually the stunning revelation that she hosted parties at which she used two-way mirrors and closed circuit television to watch guests having sex. These wild parties began in the early 1950s and continued for many years. And later, long after her death of ovarian cancer in 1984, came accusations that she was a pedophile. But we judge her artistic output separate from her crimes (see: Polanski). Her movies remain worth watching. This shot of her is circa 1960.


Femmes Fatales Feb 13 2018
Sometimes you have to write your own second act.

This shot shows the beautiful Denise Nicholas, who as an actress is known for Let's Do It Again, Blacula, A Piece of the Action, and the television series Room 222. After all those credits she became a novelist and wrote Freshwater Road, which was selected as one of the best books of 2005 by the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, and several other papers. That's a feat—not just writing a novel but writing a widely acclaimed novel—we don't think very many other film performers have managed. At the moment Nicholas seems to be retired, but you never know when it comes to writers. The above image is from around 1975.


Femmes Fatales Feb 10 2018
Knight shoots pawn—check and mate.

Patricia Knight made only five motion pictures, but one of them was 1949's Shockproof, which falls into the category of under appreciated film noir. She plays an ex-convict who moves in with her parole officer. Yeah—bad idea, but no need to say more because we already talked about the film in detail. Check here. Knight married her Shockproof co-star Cornel Wilde and, except for a few more roles, that was pretty much the end of her career. But her contribution to film noir is remembered as one of the better ones. This is a promo photo from the movie, 1949.


Femmes Fatales Feb 5 2018
Pronounce it wrong one more time. I dare you.

American actress Nancy Guild's name actually rhymed with “wild” not “guilt,” according to her, and since she's armed we'll call her anything she wants. She appeared in the noir thrillers Somewhere in the Night, which we talked about here, and Dashiell Hammett's The Brasher Doubloon, as well as about a dozen more films before quitting show business to marry producer Ernest H. Martin. This photo was made in 1947.


Femmes Fatales Feb 2 2018
The ficus: protective cover at its most succulent.

We aren't 100% sure this is a ficus tree, but we are 100% sure that hiding behind it is Alexandra Hay, who was an exotic species all her own—an actress actually born in Los Angeles. Over the course of an eleven year film career she appeared in such films as The Love Machine, Skidoo, and 1,000 Convicts and a Woman, and bolstered her cinema résumé with numerous television credits. She had already left show business when she died, aged 46, of a heart condition. This photo is undated but probably from around 1968.


Femmes Fatales Jan 30 2018
Genetics or athletics? She'll never tell.

Bet you thought all women in the mid-century era were soft and lush. Well, Suzanne Ames, née Suzanne Ainbinder, is tight as a drum and proves it by donning a barely there outfit made of flowers, gossamer, and some overtaxed stitching. She was never more than a bit player in Hollywood, but she had a good career as a dancer in New York City, which is probably where she got the abs. She later founded the Suzanne Ames Landry Performing Arts Studio in Akron, Ohio. First lesson for students—crunches. This photo is undated, but from the early 1950s.


Femmes Fatales Jan 25 2018
Gimme a girl with hair, long beautiful hair...

We've actually never seen the musical Hair. It was before our time. But we know of the song, so that's what we did with our subhead on this promo photo of model and AV actress Kuroki Kaoru, who during her heyday caused a sensation in Japan with her decision to grow feather dusters under her arms. Her intent was to protest restrictions against showing pubic hair in Japanese movies, but the act was also seen as feminist, and she became a hero for women who felt constrained by unreasonable beauty standards. For our part* we just appreciate the impact of the image—it's an amazing shot, dating from 1988.

*We've told the Pulp Intl. girlfriends many times we wouldn't care if they stopped shaving but they do it anyway. They're just fastidious that way, and in a beach town maybe you can only push grooming standards so far. But what a conversation starter they'd be in sleeveless tops.


Femmes Fatales Jan 21 2018
Outer space is a cold, empty, indifferent void. But only in places.

Way back in 2009 we shared a production photo of Italian actress Ornella Muti from the 1980 schlock space opera Flash Gordon. It was a nice shot, but we recently acquired this much better promo image of her in the same crazy costume as Princess Aura and thought we'd bring her back. As celestial bodies go she's one of the best.


Femmes Fatales Jan 15 2018
The day just got a whole lot brighter.

Above, a promo photo of British actress Dawn Addams, who appeared in films such as The Unknown Man and The Robe, seen here circa 1950.


Femmes Fatales Jan 14 2018
Somebody please help me quit this terrible habit.

U.S. born actress Helen Stanley clowns around in this unusual promo image from 1953. She appeared in such films as Snows of Kilimanjaro, Dial Red O, and Girls' Town, which was her debut in 1942 under her first stage name Dolores Diane. Here's serious pulp cred for you: she was married to mob enforcer Johnny Stompanato, the guy who was famously stabbed to death by Lana Turner's daughter. Johnny Stomp, as he was known, basically took over Stanley's career, so when she divorced him in 1955 it must have felt a bit like getting off this hook. You can read about Stompanato's bloody demise here and here.


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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
March 22
1963—Profumo Denies Affair
In England, the Secretary of State for War, John Profumo, denies any impropriety with showgirl Christine Keeler and threatens to sue anyone repeating the allegations. The accusations involve not just infidelity, but the possibility acquaintances of Keeler might be trying to ply Profumo for nuclear secrets. In June, Profumo finally resigns from the government after confessing his sexual involvement with Keeler and admitting he lied to parliament.
1978—Karl Wallenda Falls to His Death
World famous German daredevil and high-wire walker Karl Wallenda, founder of the acrobatic troupe The Flying Wallendas, falls to his death attempting to walk on a cable strung between the two towers of the Condado Plaza Hotel in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Wallenda is seventy-three years old at the time, but it is a 30 mph wind, rather than age, that is generally blamed for sending him from the wire.
2006—Swedish Spy Stig Wennerstrom Dies
Swedish air force colonel Stig Wennerström, who had been convicted in the 1970s of passing Swedish, U.S. and NATO secrets to the Soviet Union over the course of fifteen years, dies in an old age home at the age of ninety-nine. The Wennerström affair, as some called it, was at the time one of the biggest scandals of the Cold War.
March 21
1963—Alcatraz Closes
The federal penitentiary located on Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay closes. The island had been home to a lighthouse, a military fortification, and a military prison over the years. In 1972, it would become a national recreation area open to tourists, and it would receive national landmark designations in 1976 and 1986.
March 20
1916—Einstein Publishes General Relativity
German-born theoretical physicist Albert Einstein publishes his general theory of relativity. Among the effects of the theory are phenomena such as the curvature of space-time, the bending of rays of light in gravitational fields, faster than light universe expansion, and the warping of space time around a rotating body.
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