Intl. Notebook Oct 18 2016
She's poetry in motion, a terrible sight to see.

Above is a shot of the nuclear detonation code-named Chama, which was part of Operation Dominic, a series of tests conducted in the South Pacific on remote Johnston Atoll, aka Kalama Atoll, with this blast occurring today in 1962. Have you been paying attention to what's going on with nuclear weapons and nuclear confrontation today? The Cold War never ended, and the recent tensions between the U.S. and Russia, centered around a looming proxy war in Syria, has brought the possibility of nuclear conflict closer than it has been at any time since the Cuban Missile Crisis. That isn't our analysis—that's the analysis of some of the foremost political historians and diplomacy experts in the world. Some Tuesday cheer for you. 


Intl. Notebook Oct 18 2016
I just love reading the literary classics. They're always so interest... zzzzzzz...

Above is one of our prouder acquisitions—a poster of Dutch actress Sylvia Kristel made to promote the film Emmanuelle. The piece has multiple fold lines, which we could remove from the digital reproduction if we wanted, but we like the lines. We're sharing this because Kristel died today four years ago and we think this shot is a nice reminder of what a lovely and ethereal star she was.


Intl. Notebook Sep 10 2016
The kiss that never ends.

The woman from the famous Alfred Eisenstaedt of a U.S. Navy sailor kissing a stranger in New York City's Times Square on August 14, 1945 has died at age ninety-two in Richmond, Virginia. The photo was made on Victory over Japan Day—better known as VJ Day—when New Yorkers were celebrating the end of World War II. Greta Friedman, who for many decades went identified, said of the moment, “It wasn’t my choice to be kissed. The guy just came over and grabbed. [He] was very strong. I did not see him approaching, and before I know it I was in this tight grip.” While today such an act would be unambiguously categorized as sexual assault—which makes perfect sense, because what woman wants to be grabbed and kissed against their will?—Friedman's relatives have said that in “that circumstance, that situation, that time,” the still unidentified sailor did nothing wrong. The result was one of the most renowned photographs ever made.


Intl. Notebook Sep 9 2016
Enquirer cover model makes a de-emancipation proclamation.

Pictured on this cover of National Enquirer from today in 1963 is Helle Wingsoe, who was a Miss Denmark titleholder from the 1950s who later appeared in numerous American magazines as both herself and as Annette Casir. At least, that's the rundown online sources give, and the internet never gets it wrong, right? Wrong. A Finnish hosted database of European pageant winners lists no Miss Denmark named Helle Wingsoe. We also checked out the other winners from the 1950s and none of them seem to be Wingsoe either. So that bit's wrong. Enquirer calls Wingsoe an actress but she accumulated no credits in any film productions, so that appears to be incorrect as well, though it's almost certain she aspired to be an actress. Maybe she had a few uncredited walk-ons. And lastly, we have doubts she's aka Annette Casir. Look at this photo (try to focus on the face, people), and compare it to the one below, which shows Wingsoe a bit more clearly. Are those the same person? Really hard to say, but we're dubious. Oh, and we almost forgot—we doubt she ever said she wanted to be some man's slave. Seriously, who would say something that ridiculous? But the bold text would have been pure catnip for the then-predominantly male readership of Enquirer. Anybody out there got better info on Wingsoe/Casir? Drop us a line. We'd love to know.


Intl. Notebook Aug 12 2016
Your intermission, should you choose to accept it.

It had to happen. The wide world calls like it does every summer, so we're off to see new things, meet new people, and hopefully collect new oddities. We'll be back online in one week, if all goes to plan. Please enjoy the site in our absence. New visitors, welcome to one of the best nooks on the internet for old tabloids, Japanese posters, obscure vintage movies, and random amusing tidbits. Here's a link for tabloids. Here's one for Japanese posters. Here's an obscure vintage movie. And here's something random and amusing. There are 3,523 posts in Pulp Intl.—i.e. ample opportunities to waste time and have fun while doing it. Have a look around at some of our tasty rarities and we'll be back in a flash, recharged and hungover. 


Intl. Notebook Aug 9 2016
Monroe is the pause that refreshes.

Below, a Marilyn Monroe cover and interior pages from an August 1962 issue of France's Stop magazine. We grabbed this in Paris back in 2009. Yes, there's other stuff in the issue, but summer makes us lazy about scanning—and surely Monroe is more than enough.


Intl. Notebook Jul 27 2016
It doesn't look like much now but wait until it spreads its wings.

This image shows the first instant of the French nuclear test Pégase, which took place at Mururoa Atoll in French Polynesia today in 1970. Pégase is of course French for Pegasus, but this particular aerial phenomenon isn't something you ride through the sky to perform acts of heroism. The protrusions at the bottom of the plasma ball are wires used to stabilize the testing tower vaporizing, a phenomenon you can see in better detail here and here. You can also see a typical testing tower with wires intact here.


Intl. Notebook Jul 11 2016
Acme semaphores and intersections of history.

A couple of days ago we shared a photo of Martha Vickers sitting atop an old-fashioned traffic signal. Such devices—with flags that popped up bearing the words “stop” and “go” as a bell rang—were known as semaphores. The particular type seen with Vickers was manufactured by the Acme Traffic Signal Company and used primarily in the Los Angeles area. Other cities had different types of signals. For instance San Francisco primarily had Wiley traffic signals. Acme semaphores were general around L.A. during the 1920s and 1930s, but due to the tendency of birds to set up house inside the flag mechanism, the signals were soon deemed inadequate. They were eventually replaced by standard three-light traffic signals, with the last semaphores coming down during the mid-1950s. Like us, you may be aware of Acme semaphores thanks to their appearances in Warner Brothers or Loonie Tunes cartoons, or perhaps you even remember them from personal experience. Well, today you get to ride down memory lane, because above and below we have a collection of photos of these elegant inventions, with mid-century L.A. providing the backdrop.


Intl. Notebook Jul 6 2016
Ericsson robot bridges the communication gap.

This interesting photo of a giant robot holding a telephone was shot in Mexico City and documents an advertising effort from the Swedish communications company Allmänna Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson, known in Mexico as simply Teléfonos Ericsson. The robot was one of many temporarily suspended above the streets of Mexico City's historic center around 1930. Want to see another 1930s promotional robot? Check out Elektro.


Intl. Notebook Jul 2 2016
Comprehensive photography book looks back at Cuba during the 1960s.

Seems everyone's talking about Cuba these days. Barack Obama became the first U.S. president to visit the island in ages, and every megacorporation from Home Depot to Major League Baseball wants to do business there. By any measure, Cuba's is a remarkable story, particularly its educational and medical accomplishments in the face of an economic blockade that keeps out everything from computer chips to breakfast cereal.

Despite that embargo, Cubans can convincingly claim to be better off than residents in nearby capitalist nations like Honduras (highest per capita murder rate in the world), El Salvador (thousands killed each year by rampaging drug gangs), Haiti (59% poverty rate), and even Puerto Rico ($70 billion in debt—an astonishing $20,000 per resident). But one thing Cubans don't have is the opportunity to accumulate wealth. That may be about to change.

At such a moment, then, it seems like a good opportunity to look back at Cuba as it was during the heady days during and just after the Cuban Revolution. Cuba la fotografía de los años 60 is a large volume of images from that time, shot by such figures as Ernesto Fernández, Alberto Korda, and Raúl Corrales. The photos are mostly rare, and the technical quality is consistently high. We scanned the images below several years ago (the book appeared in 1988), but only just got around to sharing them today. As a bonus, there's an eloquent preface written by Roberto Fernández Retamar, which we've uploaded in its entirety.
If you've followed Pulp Intl. for a while you probably know we lived in Central America for some years, spending most of our time in Guatemala, but traveling around to numerous countries on the isthmus and in the Caribbean. So the region is a subject of some interest to us. Cuba will gain plenty from being allowed to reconnect with the world, but it will lose plenty too. It's impossible to know what sort of balance will be struck. Cubans, excited but also concerned, hope for a better one than exists in many of its neighbor countries, but only time will tell. 


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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
October 23
1935—Four Gangsters Gunned Down in New Jersey
In Newark, New Jersey, the organized crime figures Dutch Schultz, Abe Landau, Otto Berman, and Bernard "Lulu" Rosencrantz are fatally shot at the Palace Chophouse restaurant. Schultz, who was the target, lingers in the hospital for about a day before dying. The killings are committed by a group of professional gunmen known as Murder, Inc., and the event becomes known as the Chophouse Massacre.
1950—Al Jolson Dies
Vaudeville and screen performer Al Jolson dies of a heart attack in San Francisco after a trip to Korea to entertain troops causes lung problems. Jolson is best known for his film The Jazz Singer, and for his performances in blackface make-up, which were not considered offensive at the time, but have now come to be seen as a form of racial bigotry.
October 22
1926—Houdini Fatally Punched in Stomach
After a performance in Montreal, Hungarian-born magician and escape artist Harry Houdini is approached by a university student named J. Gordon Whitehead, who asks if it is true that Houdini can endure any blow to the stomach. Before Houdini is ready Whitehead strikes him several times, causing internal injuries that lead to the magician's death.
October 21
1973—Kidnappers Cut Off Getty's Ear
After holding Jean Paul Getty III for more than three months, kidnappers cut off his ear and mail it to a newspaper in Rome. Because of a postal strike it doesn't arrive until November 8. Along with the ear is a lock of hair and ransom note that says: "This is Paul’s ear. If we don’t get some money within 10 days, then the other ear will arrive. In other words, he will arrive in little bits." Getty's grandfather, billionaire oilman Jean Paul Getty, at first refused to pay the 3.2 million dollar ransom, then negotiated it down to 2.8 million, and finally agreed to pay as long as his grandson repaid the sum at 4% interest.

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