Vintage Pulp Oct 8 2015
Now if I put the remote over the blood and ESPN on the tv it should be days before anyone notices he’s dead.

We’ve seen this cover on a few other sites, but we love it, so we thought we’d share it anyway. Deadlock concerns a New York City detective (Ruth Fenisong’s ongoing character Gridley Nelson—yes, Gridley) trying to solve the murder of a philanthropist who turns out to be less of a saint than previously thought, and whose murder is followed by a second and third that eventually shed light on the mystery. 1953, with John McDermott the hand behind this art with its deftly executed overhead perspective.


Vintage Pulp Oct 7 2015
Um, why don’t I just slip out so you and your wife can talk. Wait—let me rephrase that.

“They found gutter love with gutter tramps!” We’re guessing you get two gutterballs, then it’s someone else’s turn. Greenleaf Classics provides more fun coverness, this time from its Midnight Reader imprint, Slum Sinners, by Andrew Shaw, who was really Lawrence Block, at least in this case. Some sites say Donald E. Westlake wrote this, but authoritative sources (Block) say Westlake wasn’t Shaw until after 1963. This one is from ’62, so it’s Block. No artist info, but it’s probably Tony Calvano..


Vintage Pulp Oct 6 2015
Willing girls and wild southern boys.

We mentioned the wave of rural sleaze fiction that hit the literary scene. Well, there were so many it seems they ran out of titles. Above you see the cover of another novel called Backwoods Shack, this time by Paul Daniels for Magnet Books. This one is a bit different from the last Backwoods Shack—the last featured a love triangle, but this is more like a sex polygon. Here the spoiled and entitled offspring of important figures in a hick town use a secluded shack for blowout parties, until discretion goes out the window and problems arise. 1960 copyright. 


Vintage Pulp Oct 5 2015
Yamashina gets dripping wet.

Here’s another movie we haven’t seen. Are you sensing a theme lately? We have too many of these Japanese images to actually seek out and watch all the films, so we’ve decided to focus on the art. This piece promotes Hanayome wa nureteita, aka The Bride Was Wet, with Yuri Yamashina, and below you see her in several promo imgaes we dug up. We learned from checking other sites that the movie has a Yakuza subplot to go along with its wet bride, so really, how can it miss? If we ever find a copy of the film we’ll revisit the subject. Hanayome wa nureteita premiered today in 1974. That’s the same date as the movie below and in fact the two played as halves of a double feature in many cinemas. 


Vintage Pulp Oct 5 2015
Something to take your breath away.

Above, a poster for the erotic drama Kyoran no aegi, aka Morning Frenzy, Panting Frenzy, and Frantic Wheezing, none of which sound the least bit sexy. But we wouldn’t know because we haven’t seen this one. It’s apparently an effort to mix roman porno with film noir and wasn’t well recieved. Kyoran no aegi starred Maya Hiromi and Hitomi Kozue, and it premiered in Japan today in 1974. 

Vintage Pulp Oct 4 2015
What happens in the sticks stays in the sticks.

More hicksploitation from Hallam Whitney, aka Harry Whittington—Backwoods Shack, for Carnival Books, digest format with great cover art by Rudy Nappi. A love triangle in the Florida outback is centered on hot-to-trot “backwoods trash” Lora and her two suitors, uptight Roger and and proudly countrified Cliff. 1954 copyright.


Vintage Pulp Oct 3 2015
You knew that he would.

Above is another rare double-sided Robert Bonfils paperback cover, this time for Any Man’s Playmate and Strumpet’s Jungle, written by Rubel, aka  James Rubel, and Sloane Britain, respectively. See the first example we shared here


Vintage Pulp Oct 2 2015
There’s a dark cloud on the horizon.

The Human Tornado is a movie that, as a blaxploitation spoof, doesn’t take itself at all seriously yet is still horrendous. Like really bad. Probably the hardest part of watching it is slogging through an opening stand-up bit by star Rudy Ray Moore that is cringe inducingly awful. After that you get a few flashes of cleverness surrounded by ninety minutes of disastrous writing, acting, direction, sound, editing, and future Ghostbuster Ernie Hudson. All of this is good fodder for witty viewers, perhaps, but does not entertain those who are not fans of bad cinema. Which is to say, this one may have put the Pulp Intl. girlfriends off low budget movies forever. Again. But we will forge ahead, bravely, on our own, because The Human Tornado was the middle of three movies starring Moore’s creation Dolomite, and we’ll be watching the other two entries in the franchise, come hell, high water, or cyclonic winds. The Human Tornado premiered in the U.S. today in 1976.


Vintage Pulp Oct 1 2015
Life and death at the edge of a razor.

This promo is for Jigoku no tenshi: Akai bakuon, aka Hells Angels: Crimson Roar, one of scores of girl gang movies that deluged Japanese cinema during the 1970s. This one is from Toei Company and concerns a gang member named Yoko, played by Yûko Iruka, who spends three years in prison for assault with a switchblade, and afterward emerges onto the mean, nightclub-lined streets of her coastal hometown. You know Japanese bars are sleazy when their names are English—Bar Lucky, The Apollo, The Happening, Club Ace, New York 3, et al. We especially liked the placard that read: Girls can get so excited and lustful sometimes, as shown in this picture. Why don’t you come in now? The girls working for me are so sexy. You can try to satisfy them. Yes, even sex club signage is polite in Japan.

These places are all geared toward American servicemen, of course, and the distaste for Western decadence, though subtle, is clear. But it isn’t Americans who are a problem for Yoko—it’s a group of pesky Yakuza who make their home at the Lonely Angel bar. After Yoko is drugged into paralysis and raped by two of the slimier specimens she hones that trusty switchblade of hers and goes on a revenge spree that, well, doesn’t end nicely for her enemies. She gets timely help from her boyfriend, and when he ends up on the point of a katana, that makes her even angrier. Turns out she’s deadly with a sniper rifle too. Standard stuff, but with an unusual and effective star in Iruka, and Reiko Ike’s 1973 hit song “Futen Gurashi Part 2” recurring throughout the soundtrack—a bonus.  Jigoku no tenshi: Akai bakuon premiered in Japan today in 1977.


Vintage Pulp Sep 30 2015
You know, you’re really quite a lovely little… GAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHH!

Above we see the instant before the main character on the cover of Yankee Trader realizes boiling water has been poured atop his wiener. Okay, that’s not what really happens, though he would deserve it. The story is set in colonial Connecticut and Africa, and he's a slave trader and all around scoundrel who will stop at nothing to get rich. We checked a review from 1947, when the book was originally published, and critic W.E. Hall admitted that, yes, it’s true early American colonists were guilty of “misdemeanors” against Africans. Misdemeanors? Slavery, murder, and rape? Oh, what a lovely dream world where these are mere lapses of decorum. Maybe it’s Hall who needed to have his wiener parboiled. 1952 on this Pyramid paperback, with uncredited art.


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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
October 08
1918—Sgt. York Becomes a Hero
During World War I, in the Argonne Forest in France, America Corporal Alvin C. York leads an attack on a German machine gun nest that kills 25 and captures 132. He is a corporal during the event, but is promoted to sergeant as a result. He also earns Medal of Honor from the U.S., the Croix de Guerre from the French Republic, and the Croce di Guerra from Italy and Montenegro. Stateside, he is celebrated as a hero, and Hollywood even makes a movie entitled Sergeant York, starring Gary Cooper.
1956—Larsen Pitches Perfect Game
The New York Yankees' Don Larsen pitches a perfect game in the World Series against hated rivals the Brooklyn Dodgers. It is the only perfect game in World Series history, as well as the only no-hitter.
October 07
1959—Dark Side of Moon Revealed
The Soviet space probe Luna 3 transmits the first photographs of the far side of the moon. The photos generate great interest, and scientists are surprised to see mountainous terrain, very different from the near side, and only two seas, which the Soviets name Mare Moscovrae (Sea of Moscow) and Mare Desiderii (Sea of Desire).
October 06
1966—LSD Declared Illegal in U.S.
LSD, which was originally synthesized by a Swiss doctor and was later secretly used by the CIA on military personnel, prostitutes, the mentally ill, and members of the general public in a project code named MKULTRA, is designated a controlled substance in the United States.

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