Vintage Pulp Sep 19 2014
TWO KINDS OF BLUE
Which came first—the nightgown or the nudity?

Above, two Technicolor lithographs of an unknown model against a blue velvet backdrop. These were published separately, with the bottom shot “Blue Mood” appearing in 1951, and the top shot entitled “Red Hot & Blue” appearing much later in 1966. Strange that the clothed image came later, but in any case they complement each other nicely, with the second featuring an almost “ta-dah!” pose from the model. It’s as if she’s saying, “You wanted the nightie gone—it’s gone.” Chronologically speaking, it would be more accurate to say she started naked and got dressed, but where’s the fun in that? Using old negatives was common practice for the makers of Technicolor lithos—Champion Line, U.I. Co., A. Scheer, J.S.I., Corp. A. Fox (also referred to as A. Fox Corp.), and others. It was Fox that published these, and we’ll have more of their output later. You can see about a dozen more Technicolor lithos by clicking here.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 17 2014
DARLING NIKKI
Part angel, part goddess, and part alley cat.

Seems like one good Midwood deserves another, so here’s another effort from them—Don Rico’s Nikki, published in 1963. After years writing for comics, this was Rico’s first novel, and he would later publish other books as Dan Rico, Donella St. Michaels, Donna Richards, Joseph Milton, et al. The back cover text for Nikki is unusually entertaining, so we’ve got that below as well. The excellent art is the work of Robert Schulz.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 15 2014
EASY RADER
I think it’s really cute when a guy wears pajamas, but I have something even more comfortable you can slip into.

This is one of the prettiest Paul Rader covers we’ve seen, which is really saying something considering he painted this and this. But this stellar turquoise and gold effort for Joan Ellis’s Sooner or Later may be our favorite Rader yet. Note how the placement of the girl’s elbow suggests an erection on her tormented brother-in-law. Joan Ellis was in reality author Julie Ellis, and she also wrote as Linda Michaels, Jill Monte, and Susan Richard. She went on to author serious fiction, but even if those later books were better written, we bet none of them looked as appealing as this.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 15 2014
ASSASSIN'S CREED
Sonny Chiba is the Duke of hazard.

Above, a poster for Golgo 13: Kûron no kubi, aka Golgo 13: Assignment Kowloon, starring Sonny Chiba, who is better known as Shin’ichi Chiba in his native Japan and the rest of Asia. Chiba plays an assassin named Duke Togo, but codenamed Golgo 13, whose latest contract proves more complex than he imagined. The movie, based on a popular manga, was a Japanese production set in Hong Kong, and was an influence on the excellent crime thrillers that came out of Hong Kong in the 1980s, particularly those by John Woo. Plenty of reviews online so we won’t go into detail, except to say that this one is well worth a viewing, in our opinion. Golgo 13: Kûron no kubi premiered in Japan today in 1977.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 12 2014
STAYING ALIVE
Burnt to a crisp in Berlin? Not even close, according to The National Police Gazette.

This September 1964 National Police Gazette cover is the twenty-fourth we’ve found starring Adolf Hitler within the date range 1951 to 1966. You get the idea here—Hitler didn’t die in Berlin, because he was harder to eradicate than polio, and was instead living in the tropics/Argentina/Antarctica plotting to build a Fourth Reich. We mentioned before that we thought Hitler appeared on the cover of the Gazette twice a year. That’s now confirmed. We found five more covers to bring his total to twenty-nine between ’51 and ’66. When you consider how often other Reich figures such as Adolf Eichmann starred, it becomes clear the Nazis were a cottage industry for the Gazette, which used tales of their dreaded return to induce outrage and fear—and no small amount of newsstand sales. In that way we consider this magazine (and others) to be the precursor to today’s American cable news, where inducing outrage and fear has overtaken responsible journalism as a modus operandi. The Gazette would use Hitler for as long as it plausibly could—we have a cover from 1974 claming he was still alive at age eighty-five—before focusing on other fictional threats, such as the scientific community. That sounds familiar too, doesn’t it? We’ll have more from Gazette and Hitler later.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 11 2014
ALPHA BEAST
Faced with this position surrender is the only option.

Here you see a pose that appears over and over in vintage paperback art—one figure looming menacingly in the foreground as a second cowers in the triangular negative space created by the first’s spread legs. This pose is so common it should have a name. We’re thinking “the alpha,” because it signifies male dominance and because of the a-shape the pose makes. True, on occasion the dominator isn’t male, sometimes the unfortunate sprawled figure is depicted outside the a-shaped space, and sometimes the art expresses something other than dominance, but basically the alpha (see, that just sounds right, doesn’t it?) has been used scores of times with only minor variation. You’ll notice several of these come from subsidiaries of the sleaze publisher Greenleaf Classics. It was a go-to cover style for them. We have twenty examples in all, with art by Bob Abbett, Robert Bonfils, Michel Gourdon, and others.

 
diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 10 2014
ART OF NEGOTIATION
But baby, sweetie, please, all the other guys are going.


“But I’ll be back early, I promise.”
 
“No.”
 
“I’ll only have a few drinks.”
 
“You mean like last time? Forget it.”
 
“You and I will do something fun tomorrow night.”
 
“No.”
 
“I’ll wash the dishes.”
 
“You’re going to wash the dishes anyway, buster.”
 
Above is one of our favorite Robert McGinnis covers, produced for Vin Packer’s The Damnation of Adam Blessing, a book that has nothing to do with marital negotiations, but rather is the story of a charming psychopath similar to Patricia Highsmith’s famed Tom Ripley. Packer was one of several pen names used by prolific American author Marijane Meaker, and interestingly, she and Highsmith had a romantic relationship for two years in the late 1950s. Using the Packer identity Meaker wrote twenty novels, with this one appearing in 1961.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 9 2014
GANGS OF TOKYO
Crime, mayhem, and murder in Japan.

Above, six Japanese posters for 1950s and 1960s gangster movies. These are, top to bottom, Shichinin no yajû: chi no sengen, aka Return of the Filthy Seven, Sono gosôsha wo nerae: “Jûsangô taihisen” yori, aka Take Aim at the Police Van, Kawaita hana, aka The Pale Flower, Kutabare akutô-domo—Tantei jimusho 23, aka Detective Bureau 2-3: Go to Hell Bastards, and finally two versions of Gendai yakuza: yotamono jingi, aka Hoodlum Yakuza 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 8 2014
FINEST HOUR
It's one of the best uses of sixty minutes we can imagine (that doesn't involve taking off our clothes).

We have quite a bit of Spanish pulp we’ve been lazy about sharing, but today we’re remedying that at least a little. We snagged this little item entitled El Piño y la Palmera (The Pine and the Palm) in Spain several years ago. It’s one of Madrid-based Editores Reunidos’ novelas de una hora, or one-hour novels, so-named because it’s about 60 pages long (more like 50, after masthead credits, illustrations, and rear advertising). This one appeared all the way back in 1936 and has fiction from Francisco Camba and art credited to Bocquet y Longoria. The way Spanish surnames function, this could be one person, but in this case it’s two—cover artist José Longoria and interior artist José P. Bocquet. We got this for two euros, which we think is a pretty nice price for an hour’s entertainment.
 

 
diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 7 2014
WOMEN'S ACCESSORIES
No, the other gun, silly. The one that matches my shoes. The one with the pearl inlay. Geez, men are so dense.

Above, the cover for Robert O. Saber’s, aka Milton K. Ozaki’s Chicago-based tale of crooked cops and robbers A Time for Murder, 1956. The artist here is Walter Popp. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Next Page
Previous Page
Featured Pulp
japanese themed aslan cover
cure bootleg by aslan
five aslan fontana sleeves
aslan trio for grand damier
ASLAN Harper Lee cover
ASLAN COVER FOr Dekobra
Four Aslan Covers for Parme
History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
September 30
1955—James Dean Dies in Auto Accident
American actor James Dean, who appeared in the films Giant, East of Eden, and the iconic Rebel without a Cause, dies in an auto accident at age 24 when his Porsche 550 Spyder is hit head-on by a larger Ford coupe. The driver of the Ford had been trying to make a left turn across the rural highway U.S. Route 466 and never saw Dean's small sports car approaching.
1962—Chavez Founds UFW
Mexican-American farm worker César Chávez founds the United Farm Workers in California. His strikes, marches and boycotts eventually result in improved working conditions for manual farm laborers and today his birthday is celebrated as a holiday in eight U.S. states.
September 29
1916—Rockefeller Breaks the Billion Barrier
American industrialist John D. Rockefeller becomes America's first billionaire. His Standard Oil Company had gained near total control of the U.S. petroleum market until being broken up by anti-trust legislators in 1911. Afterward, Rockefeller used his fortune mainly for philanthropy, and had a major effect on medicine, education, and scientific research.
September 28
1941—Williams Bats .406
Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox finishes the Major League Baseball season with a batting average of .406. He is the last player to bat .400 or better in a season.

Advertise Here
Reader Pulp
It's easy. We have an uploader that makes it a snap. Use it to submit your art, text, header, and subhead. Your post can be funny, serious, or anything in between, as long as it's vintage pulp. You'll get a byline and experience the fleeting pride of free authorship. We'll edit your post for typos, but the rest is up to you. Click here to give us your best shot.

Pulp Covers
Pulp art from around the web
zontarmag.blogspot.com/2014/09/sip-spacial-international-police-spain.html savedfromthepaperdrive.blogspot.com/2014/09/sleazy-paperbacks-shelf-55.html
www.papy-dulaut.com/10-categorie-10641566.html www.dandare.info/biblio/boardman200.htm
www.scoop.it/t/vintage-images johnnybombshell.tumblr.com/post/21433986067/swedish-pulp
Pulp Advertising
Things you'd love to buy but can't anymore
PulpInternational.com Vintage Ads
Humor Blog Directory
About Email Legal RSS RSS Tabloid Femmes Fatales Hollywoodland Intl. Notebook Mondo Bizarro Musiquarium Politique Diabolique Sex Files Sportswire