Vintage Pulp Mar 3 2015
SWAMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE
Sometimes your neighbors can be a real drag.

Today we have another issue of Australia’s Adam magazine, this time from March 1964. While the cover is similar to those of later editions, the contents are more focused on literature and less on scantily clad models. The art illustrates Jack Blake’s “Crosses of Blood,” the tale of a young couple named Hank and Gina living in the wild swamps of northern Australia who are beset by an escaped mental patient. The story is less adventure than pure horror, with the lunatic determined to see his parents—who happened to both be dead and buried nearby. He forces the couple to help him dig up the corpses, and the story ends, surprisingly, with Gina being dragged through the swamp bleeding and covered with leeches, before finally being shotgunned in the face. Pretty downbeat stuff, but decently written and convincingly frightening. We have thirteen scans below and thirty-nine other issues of Adam you can see by clicking here.

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Vintage Pulp Feb 28 2015
HONG KONG TROUBLE
Be careful about looking for cheap thrills—you might just find them.

This issue of Adam magazine with its nice cover art illustrating Arthur J Bryant’s story “Hey-Day in Hong Kong” appeared this month in 1971. Bryant’s story, which has a convincing sense of firsthand realism, is about an Aussie traveler searching Hong Kong’s red light district for a “yum-yum girl” but ends up attacked by three thugs. Turns out the hooker employs the toughs because she wants any man who purchases her services to prove he’s deserving of her gifts by fighting for her. You haven’t really had sex unless you’ve done it after being punched in the ribs and eye. Try it sometime. 

Elsewhere inside you get more fiction, a bit of fact, plus the usual assortment of humor and models, including, notably, nudist icon Diane Webber, aka Marguerite Empey. The cover art for Adam was painted by Jack Waugh and Phil Belbin. The pieces are always unsigned, but we’re thinking this is Belbin’s work because he was the go-to guy during Adam’s later years. Don’t quote us on it, though. Both Belbin and Waugh have departed this world, and we doubt there’s an Adam archive somewhere definitively crediting the covers. Anyway, we have thirty-four scans below and so many other issues of this magazine tucked away in the website it’s silly. If you want to see them just click here.

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Vintage Pulp Jan 26 2015
FAR AND WIDE
British adventure magazine takes readers to the ends of the Earth.

The British men’s adventure magazine The Wide World debuted in 1898 and lasted all the way until 1965. That’s not quite National Police Gazette or Argosy longevity, but it’s still very good. During that entire time, a span encompassing two global conflagrations and various economic fluctuations, it failed to print only four issues—including once when a German aerial bomb flattened its pre-press facility. 

The magazine’s founder was George Newnes, who also published The Strand Magazine, Tit-Bits and other titles. With The Wide World he hit upon an audacious marketing gimmick—he assured readers that every word in the magazine was true, and made “Truth Is Stranger than Fiction” the publication’s slogan. This claim was hot air, of course, but that idea—and the conceit that adventurers were a sort of global club that owed allegiance to one another—helped make the magazine a success among readers who considered themselves men of the world, or longed to be.
 
A strong focus on exotic lands and inscrutable dark-skinned inhabitants resistant to the white man’s ordained incursions likewise played well with readers, as Britain’s colonial era evolved into a post-colonial one. That makes The Wide World a repository of some ugly attitudes, however the magazine also managed such feats as being the first publication to report the death of Butch Cassidy in Bolivia, and publishing stories by many literary notables. Above and below you see a collection of covers, nicely rendered in pulp style by various artists.

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Vintage Pulp Jan 15 2015
TRAINING DAY
Good boy. Now that you’ve got begging mastered let’s see how you do at playing dead.

Above, Marked for Murder, written by Robert O. Saber, aka Milton K. Ozaki, published originally in 1955, with this edition from Australia’s Phantom Books appearing in 1956. Artist unknown.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 31 2014
LAW OF THE JUNGLE
Survival of the fittest—or just the person with the gun.

This issue of Australia’s Adam published in December 1971 has a rather nice cover illustrating a story by Adam Greenhill entitled “Nightmare in Timor.” We see the moonlit moment when the villains try to kill the hero, but need to make it look as if he’s been hacked to death by Timorese tribesmen. The girl, named Violet in the tale, plans to shoot the protagonist only in the unlikely event he survives the fight. 

One thing about these 1970s Aussie writers is that they use the nearby lands of Timor, Malaysia, the Philippines, et al. to good effect, setting many stories in the jungles of those countries. The best writers do more than simply depend on exotic locales. They manage to slip in details that bring the settings to life, such as quirks of language, protocols of interpersonal interaction, or the fare in local markets and restuarants.
 
American writers from the same period didn’t seem as interested in their own exotic neighbors such as Guatemala, Belize, etc., although Mexico figures somewhat prominently in U.S. pulp, as well as in film noir. In any case, Adam remains our favorite men’s magazine, and the many stories set in mysterious Asian lands are a major reason. We have twenty-nine scans below to bring your 2014 to a pleasant end.

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Vintage Pulp Nov 27 2014
MAN OF THE ARTS

Like other mid-century men’s magazines, Australia’s Man Jr. focused on text and art during its early years, but dwelled more on women and nudity during its twilight. This November 1949 issue has plenty of art. Below you’ll find story illustrations, cartoons, and more, and you can expand your appreciation of Man Jr. by clicking here and here.

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Vintage Pulp Aug 27 2014
FLIPPING FOR A DAME
You could say he fell for her head over heels.

This issue of Australia’s Adam magazine was published this month in 1967, and has a nice cover featuring a hapless bloke being shot and jiu-jitsu flipped at the same time. Talk about days you’d rather forget. The illustration is for Ted Schurmann’s “Murder in the Air,” and rest assured the guy getting the treatment here deserves it. We have thirty more scans below, thirty-five other issues of Adam you can see by starting at this link, and about twenty more issues to share.

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Vintage Pulp May 18 2014
A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE
The cover changed substantially between editions but the weirdest bit stayed.


Remember our set of paperback covers featuring women who had died with their eyes agape? Here’s another to add to the list, which we saw over at Bill Crider’s blog. It’s Robert O. Saber’s The Affair of the Frigid Blonde, published in 1950 by the Handi-Books imprint of Quinn Publishing Company, Inc. This one is a bit strange, though, because of the three men seemingly hovering in mid-air to get a look through the deceased’s skylight. We chalk the bizarre perspective up to artistic license, or maybe we’re just not seeing it right. In fact, maybe she’s not even dead. Maybe she’s just in a state of shock. If we saw three guys floating above our skylight we’d fall into a stupor too. But no, the synopsis makes clear she’s dead. 

Anyway, Robert Saber was a pseudonym used by Milton K. Ozaki, who also published frequently under his own name. The book also appeared in Australia as The Deadly Blonde in 1953, published by the Australian imprint Phantom Books, with slightly altered art. Among other details, what looks like a robot but is probably supposed to be a lamp was removed from the background, a clock disappeared, a humanoid shadow at the far right edge vanished, and the woman’s undies were made less sheer (though the floating guys still get a pretty interesting angle). All in all, this is very instructive example of how cover art changes between editions of pulp paperbacks. We’ll dig up more examples later.

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Vintage Pulp Apr 18 2014
GUT REACTION
Some things are just too hard to stomach.

Above is the cover of an issue of the Australian adventure magazine Adam published this month in 1974, featuring an illustration for Herb Hild’s story “Move into Danger” (called “Hike into Danger” inside the magazine). Adam is one of the best men’s publications ever produced in our opinion, though it’s becoming more difficult to collect each day, which means we’re running out of new issues to post. But we aren’t done yet. Below are thirty great page scans and you can see thirty-four more issues of Adam we’ve posted over the years by clicking here and scrolling down.

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Vintage Pulp Mar 28 2014
WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Tales from the wild frontier.

In Australia cowboys were called stockmen or ringers, but by any other name they raised hell the same way. At least, they did in pulp paperbacks. Below are ten vintage covers for westerns published in Australia during the 1950s and 1960s, and you can see more western covers from the U.S. here.

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
March 29
1951—The Rosenbergs Are Convicted of Espionage
Americans Ethel and Julius Rosenberg are convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage as a result of passing nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. While declassified documents seem to confirm Julius Rosenberg's role as a spy, Ethel Rosenberg's involvement is still a matter of dispute. Both Rosenbergs were executed on June 19, 1953.
March 28
1910—First Seaplane Takes Flight
Frenchman Henri Fabre, who had studied airplane and propeller designs and had also patented a system of flotation devices, accomplishes the first take-off from water at Martinque, France, in a plane he called Le Canard, or "the duck."
1953—Jim Thorpe Dies
American athlete Jim Thorpe, who was one of the most prolific sportsmen ever and won Olympic gold medals in the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon, played American football at the collegiate and professional levels, and also played professional baseball and basketball, dies of a heart attack.
March 27
1958—Khrushchev Becomes Premier
Nikita Khrushchev becomes premier of the Soviet Union. During his time in power he is responsible for the partial de-Stalinization of the Soviet Union, and presides over the rise of the early Soviet space program, but his many policy failures lead to him being deposed in October 1964. After his removal he is pensioned off and lives quietly the rest of his life, eventually dying of heart disease in 1971.

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