Vintage Pulp Mar 3 2015
SWAMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE
Sometimes your neighbors can be a real drag.

Today we have another issue of Australia’s Adam magazine, this time from March 1964. While the cover is similar to those of later editions, the contents are more focused on literature and less on scantily clad models. The art illustrates Jack Blake’s “Crosses of Blood,” the tale of a young couple named Hank and Gina living in the wild swamps of northern Australia who are beset by an escaped mental patient. The story is less adventure than pure horror, with the lunatic determined to see his parents—who happened to both be dead and buried nearby. He forces the couple to help him dig up the corpses, and the story ends, surprisingly, with Gina being dragged through the swamp bleeding and covered with leeches, before finally being shotgunned in the face. Pretty downbeat stuff, but decently written and convincingly frightening. We have thirteen scans below and thirty-nine other issues of Adam you can see by clicking here.

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Vintage Pulp Feb 28 2015
HONG KONG TROUBLE
Be careful about looking for cheap thrills—you might just find them.

This issue of Adam magazine with its nice cover art illustrating Arthur J Bryant’s story “Hey-Day in Hong Kong” appeared this month in 1971. Bryant’s story, which has a convincing sense of firsthand realism, is about an Aussie traveler searching Hong Kong’s red light district for a “yum-yum girl” but ends up attacked by three thugs. Turns out the hooker employs the toughs because she wants any man who purchases her services to prove he’s deserving of her gifts by fighting for her. You haven’t really had sex unless you’ve done it after being punched in the ribs and eye. Try it sometime. 

Elsewhere inside you get more fiction, a bit of fact, plus the usual assortment of humor and models, including, notably, nudist icon Diane Webber, aka Marguerite Empey. The cover art for Adam was painted by Jack Waugh and Phil Belbin. The pieces are always unsigned, but we’re thinking this is Belbin’s work because he was the go-to guy during Adam’s later years. Don’t quote us on it, though. Both Belbin and Waugh have departed this world, and we doubt there’s an Adam archive somewhere definitively crediting the covers. Anyway, we have thirty-four scans below and so many other issues of this magazine tucked away in the website it’s silly. If you want to see them just click here.

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Vintage Pulp Jan 26 2015
FAR AND WIDE
British adventure magazine takes readers to the ends of the Earth.

The British men’s adventure magazine The Wide World debuted in 1898 and lasted all the way until 1965. That’s not quite National Police Gazette or Argosy longevity, but it’s still very good. During that entire time, a span encompassing two global conflagrations and various economic fluctuations, it failed to print only four issues—including once when a German aerial bomb flattened its pre-press facility. 

The magazine’s founder was George Newnes, who also published The Strand Magazine, Tit-Bits and other titles. With The Wide World he hit upon an audacious marketing gimmick—he assured readers that every word in the magazine was true, and made “Truth Is Stranger than Fiction” the publication’s slogan. This claim was hot air, of course, but that idea—and the conceit that adventurers were a sort of global club that owed allegiance to one another—helped make the magazine a success among readers who considered themselves men of the world, or longed to be.
 
A strong focus on exotic lands and inscrutable dark-skinned inhabitants resistant to the white man’s ordained incursions likewise played well with readers, as Britain’s colonial era evolved into a post-colonial one. That makes The Wide World a repository of some ugly attitudes, however the magazine also managed such feats as being the first publication to report the death of Butch Cassidy in Bolivia, and publishing stories by many literary notables. Above and below you see a collection of covers, nicely rendered in pulp style by various artists.

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Vintage Pulp Jan 2 2015
WAR PROFITEERS
The Male capacity for violence.


Above is a Mort Kunstler cover for Male painted for the January 1965 issue. Kunstler was famed for his war panoramas, as we’ve discussed before, and if you click his keywords below you’ll see several more martial covers from him that we’ve shared. Inside Male you also get art from Charles Copeland, Samson Pollen, and Gil Cohen. The model feature is Susan Radford, who is described as a starlet but who we’d never heard of. Turns out it wasn’t just us. We checked the usual databases and found no mention of Radford anywhere, so it seems Male editors were premature in dubbing her a major riser.

Male focused on all kinds of violent adventures, but especially those dealing with warfare. This issue has four war stories dealing with the Soviet Union, China, and the Nazis, but the most notable entry is South African author Anthony Trew’s gripping Two Hours to Darkness, published here as booklength fiction. The tale is described in the contents as “the nightmarish spine-tingler that will be the movie blockbuster of 1965,” but it looks like Male was wide of the mark again, because no film based on the book was ever released. So Trew had to settle for selling a measly 3.5 million copies of the novel in sixteen languages, the hack. We have a dozen scans below.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 31 2014
LAW OF THE JUNGLE
Survival of the fittest—or just the person with the gun.

This issue of Australia’s Adam published in December 1971 has a rather nice cover illustrating a story by Adam Greenhill entitled “Nightmare in Timor.” We see the moonlit moment when the villains try to kill the hero, but need to make it look as if he’s been hacked to death by Timorese tribesmen. The girl, named Violet in the tale, plans to shoot the protagonist only in the unlikely event he survives the fight. 

One thing about these 1970s Aussie writers is that they use the nearby lands of Timor, Malaysia, the Philippines, et al. to good effect, setting many stories in the jungles of those countries. The best writers do more than simply depend on exotic locales. They manage to slip in details that bring the settings to life, such as quirks of language, protocols of interpersonal interaction, or the fare in local markets and restuarants.
 
American writers from the same period didn’t seem as interested in their own exotic neighbors such as Guatemala, Belize, etc., although Mexico figures somewhat prominently in U.S. pulp, as well as in film noir. In any case, Adam remains our favorite men’s magazine, and the many stories set in mysterious Asian lands are a major reason. We have twenty-nine scans below to bring your 2014 to a pleasant end.

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Modern Pulp Dec 22 2014
NEW YORK VISIONS
Owen Smith’s pulp influenced creations are modern masterpieces.

We don’t spend as much time as we should on what we like to call modern pulp, but we very much like contemporary artist Owen Smith and mentioned how his work fronts two of our favorite crime novels of recent years—Daniel Chavarría’s Adios Muchachos and Tango for a Torturer. Smith also created two brilliant Dashiell Hammett posters that we shared back in 2009. We wanted to get back to him, so above and below are some of his unique, pulp-style covers for The New Yorker magazine. You can see more art on his website.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 16 2014
SOLITARY STAND
Well, yes miss, usually we line up a group of similar participants, but six-foot blondes don’t exactly grow on trees.

Above, a nice cover of Master Detective from December 1953 with art by the always brilliant Barye Phillips. The magazine launched in 1924, but this is the earliest cover we’ve shared. We’ll dig a bit and see what we can find going back into the 1940s and earlier. By 1954 the covers became considerably more text heavy, which makes nearly blank examples like this worth looking for. We’ll see what we find. 

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Vintage Pulp Dec 14 2014
CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION
Despite best efforts the perpetrator remains unknown.

We’re sharing this hyperviolent true crime magazine front because the art resembles that from yesterday’s post of Tom Palmer covers for The Crime Machine. Crime Does Not Pay has no art credits, so we can’t be sure who painted the covers, but we doubt it’s Tom Palmer because, while similar in mood, Crime Does Not Pay is more cartoonish. Artists' styles evolve, of course, and a couple of years separate the two magazines, but we still doubt it's the same guy. We checked every site online that deals in these sorts of publications and none of them had a name. We also have two full issues of Crime Does Not Pay and there are definitely no art credits anywhere inside, and the pieces are unsigned to boot, so we don’t even have a pair of initials or some illegible scrawl to work from. So the above cover art—brilliant and ingenious—remains uncredited. See the other three examples of Crime Does Not Pay here, here, and here

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Vintage Pulp Nov 27 2014
MAN OF THE ARTS

Like other mid-century men’s magazines, Australia’s Man Jr. focused on text and art during its early years, but dwelled more on women and nudity during its twilight. This November 1949 issue has plenty of art. Below you’ll find story illustrations, cartoons, and more, and you can expand your appreciation of Man Jr. by clicking here and here.

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Vintage Pulp Nov 14 2014
MAN AND SUPERMAN
Up in the sky, look! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s superhunk!

Serving as something of a flipside to yesterday’s post, today we have some excellent examples of the beefcake art of George Quaintance. As we mentioned before, Quaintance’s work seems to be growing more popular all the time, and these examples were going for $150.00 and up. That makes us appreciate even more the Quaintance we got for five dollars during our U.S. trip in 2012. Your Physique was launched by bodybuilder Joe Weider when he was fourteen, which makes any plans we have for the future seem pretty unambitious by comparison. These issues date from 1946 and 1947, which were the only years Quaintance did covers for the magazine. Typically, he illustrated actual bodybuilders, and you can see their names on the covers. You may also notice an interesting juxtaposition of the Empire State Building in panel seven. Quaintance's love of the male form emanates quite strongly from these masterworks, not just because of their technical brilliance, but because of the dominant scenarios some of the figures are placed within—for example, flying above or striding across the planet. The top cover was in pretty bad shape, necessitating some restoration work in Photoshop, but the others are untouched.

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
March 05
1956—Desegregation Ruling Upheld
In the United States, the Supreme Court upholds a ban on racial segregation in state schools, colleges and universities. The University of North Carolina had been appealing an earlier ruling from 1954, which ordered college officials to admit three black students to what was previously an all-white institution. In many southern states, talk after the ruling turned toward subsidizing white students so they could attend private schools, or even abolishing public schools entirely, but ultimately, desegregation did take place.
1970—Non-Proliferation Treaty Goes into Effect
After ratification by 43 nations, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons goes into effect. Of the non-signatory nations, India and Pakistan acknowledge possessing nuclear weapons, and Israel is known to. One signatory nation, North Korea, has withdrawn from the treaty and also produced nukes. International atomic experts estimate that the number of states that accumulate the material and know-how to produce atomic weapons will soon double.
March 04
1969—The Krays Are Found Guilty of Murder
In England, twins Ronald and Reginald Kray are found guilty of the murder of Jack McVitie. The Kray brothers had been notorious gangsters in London's East End, and for their crimes both were sentenced to life in prison, and both eventually died behind bars. Their story later inspired a 1990 motion picture entitled The Krays.
1975—Charlie Chaplin Is Knighted
British-born comic genius Charlie Chaplin, whose long and turbulent career in the U.S. had been brought to an abrupt end when he was branded a communist and denied a residence visa, is bestowed a knighthood at London's Buckingham Palace. Chaplin died two years later and even then peace eluded him, as his body was stolen from its grave for eleven weeks by men trying to extort money from the Chaplin family.
March 03
1959—Lou Costello Dies
American comedian Lou Costello, of the famous comedy team Abbott & Costello, dies of a heart attack at Doctors' Hospital in Beverly Hills, three days before his 53rd birthday. His career spanned radio and film, silent movies and talkies, vaudeville and cinema, and in his heyday he was, along with partner Abbott, one of the most beloved personalities in Hollywood.

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