Vintage Pulp Dec 21 2014
PARTY ANIMALS
Lavish year-end bonuses on Wall Street lead to drunken jubilation, drug-fueled orgies, and chants of “In your face, 99%!”

There’s nothing quite like getting multi-million dollar bonuses for fleecing gullible investors. Yes, the 1% get yachts, island vacations, and hot oil massages from senators and judges, while the bottom half get evictions, stolen pensions, and the occasional trip to the government cheese line. Clearly Santa got his naughty and nice lists mixed up around 2000 and never discovered the error. 1965 publication date on this.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 20 2014
SALADE DAYS
Finally, after a lifetime's work—the condiment that will revolutionize how the world eats greenery.

Above, Drôle de salade written by Al Caussin, aka Alex Caussin de Perceval, Percy Wall, and Allan Blyth, published 1952 by France's Éditions de la Flamme d’Or, with awesome cover art from Jef de Wulf. Drôle de salade actually means “funny salad,” so you have to wonder what this book is about. In any case, what a bummer it’ll be for the main character when he finds out the term “French dressing” is already in use.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 19 2014
LITTLE SHOPPER OF HORRORS
I swear to God, bitch, you better tell me where you bought those pearls or I’ll claw that smug look right off your head.

Above, the cover of Shelly Lowenkopf’s The Love of the Lion from Kozy Books. No artist info on this, which is typical for Kozy. Lowenkopf, who is male, went on to teach at the University of Southern California, win a Lifetime Achievement Award, become an agent, editorial director, book reviewer, critic, and essayist. He’s still active and maintains a blog that’s worth visiting. Of his Kozy days he says merely that, “under a variety of pseudonyms, I paid many a rent tab.” No pseudonym for this one though. The Love of the Lion was published in 1962. 

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Vintage Pulp Dec 17 2014
CARNY DESIRE
Dammit! First he goes after the sword swallower and now that contortionist. What do these women have that I don’t?

Carnival of Passion, written by Val Munroe and published in 1952. The excellent art is by George Gross.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 15 2014
DISINHERIT THE WIND
Really? You’re really blaming the dog for that? Listen lady, I’m paying you to not move a muscle—especially that one.

Above, the cover of Rogue Wind by Ugo Moretti for Popular Library, 1954. This is serious fiction about wayward youth in facist Italy, and how the illegitimate son of a prostitute falls in love with a bourgeoise beauty. There’s love, heartbreak, war, abduction, and so much more, plus extra significance supplied by main character’s name, Vento Caldo, which in Italian means “hot wind.” So you see, the wind of the title is metaphorical because it refers to the main character. Because his name means “hot wind.” And see, the thing is, winds can be unpredictable, and since the main character is really unpredictable too, we come to see why he is, in fact, not just named “hot wind,” but is very much like a rogue wind as well. So it works on two levels. Try and follow this, now. See, “vento” means “wind,” okay? Stamp your foot twice if you get that. Good. Okay, now since “vento” means “wind,” what you have here is…

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Modern Pulp Dec 13 2014
ALPHABETICAL DISORDER
One out of two isn’t bad, when it comes to Cyrillic.

The cover of the above Soviet-issue James Hadley Chase/Victor Canning double novel isn’t particularly wonderful, but the interior illustrations are rather nice. We don’t read Cyrillic, but we painstakingly plugged the cover squiggles into a translator and came up with I’ll Bury My Dead for Chase and something like “communicating on foot” for Canning, a title which resembles those of none of his actual works. So there you go. We were actually pretty confident when we started the process. We once figured out the St. Petersburg subway system during rush hour, so we figured book titles would be a snap. No such luck. These translations appeared in 1991.

Update: The answer comes from John, who wrote in saying: пешка translates as "pawn", so a reasonable guess might be Queen's Pawn, Canning's 1969 book. The other word проходная translates as "communicating", so that is harder to work out a connection.
 
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Vintage Pulp Dec 11 2014
WHO'S UP FOR PIE?
This oughta really blow your skirt up.

We had no idea there’s a porn star named Rebecca Lane, nor that she has starred in something called Creampie Surpise, but you learn something new every day. That Rebecca Lane is not to be confused with the author Rébecca Lane, who wrote Surprise-Party for Éditions Le Styx’s collection Les fruits verts in 1958. Not to say the other Rebecca Lane isn’t talented in her own right. She very likely is. Creampies are hard to make, especially if they have those crumbly crusts. Anyway, judging by Aslan’s art, the party Rébecca Lane writes about here must have been a real surpise to get such a reaction. Alternatively, the pair could be dancing. But that’s always true, isn’t it? We all could be dancing. Okay, we’re done in France. Back home and back to other types of posts tomorrow. 

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Vintage Pulp Dec 11 2014
SOPHIE'S CHOICE
Is it best to follow the head or the heart?

Sophie et le crime is from Hachette as part of its Collection Point d’Interrogation, and was written by Cecil Saint-Laurent, aka Jacques Laurent, 1953. It’s a whodunit. A youthful and beautiful aspiring journalist is convinced the murder of a neighbor was committed by someone other than the missing husband. When the spouse appears on her doorstep proclaiming his innocence, she decides to solve the crime. But is he really innocent? There’s no artist info on this cover and no signature, which is too bad, because it’s excellent.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 10 2014
LEAPING AHEAD
Speaking of jumping me, what are you doing later?

It had been two years since we found any cover art from Louis Carrière, but Bordeaux solved that problem. Above you see his front for L’amour se joue aux dames, written by Christiane Leleu-Mazeron and published in 1950 by Éditions S.T.A.E.L. for their Collection Ciboulette. Regarding the title, “dames” means ladies of course, but “jeu de dames” actually refers to the game of checkers, or what Brits call draughts, so the complete title means “love is playing checkers.” You see that Carrière went literal with his art. If you’re interested in more of his work, just click his keywords below.

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Vintage Pulp Dec 9 2014
TOMBE RAIDER
The widow is about to join her husband.

Above is another treasure from Saturday—Une tombe pour la veuve, which means “a grave for the widow,” 1961, from publishers Éditions de Lutèce for their L’Agence Héléna series. The book is billed as an unpublished novel from Francis Fortunas, a pseudonym of Jean Denis, and it cost us two little euros at the Place de Quinconces. Art is uncredited, but signed GB, which is probably Georges Boland. 

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
December 21
1958—de Gaulle Elected President of France
World War II hero General Charles de Gaulle is elected President of France by an overwhelming majority. During his time he leads France to develop nuclear weapons, ends the French presence in Algeria, and survives several assassination attempts. He eventually retires to Colombey-les-Deux-Eglises, in north-east France, and dies from a heart attack on 9 November 1970.
December 20
1989—U.S. Invades Panama
The United States invades Panama with the goal of overthrowing the dictatorship of Manuel Noriega. Noriega had been a CIA agent for many years, and because of this special status, U.S. drug authorities had turned a blind eye toward his activities, which included helping to create a crack cocaine epidemic in American inner cities. In 1988, Senator John Kerry's Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and International Operations concluded that the Noriega saga represented one of the most serious foreign policy failures in U.S. history.
December 19
1984—Britain Agrees to Cede Hong Kong
Great Britain signs over Hong Kong to China in an agreement stipulating that the colony be returned to the Chinese in 1997. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher signs the Joint Sino-British Declaration with her Chinese counterpart Zhao Ziyang, while political groups in Hong Kong push futilely for independence.

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