Femmes Fatales Jul 3 2015
SPAAK EASY
Effortless, for summer.


We featured French actress Catherine Spaak as a femme fatale a couple of years ago but recently came across the above photo of her and decided on a return engagement. Why? Because this outfit is killer. We love it. We want to see our girlfriends in it. Hell, we want to see every girl in it. We’d even wear it—and make it look better than you can possibly imagine. Oh yeah. 1966 on the shot.

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Vintage Pulp Jul 2 2015
DRIVING TEST
Scenes from the class struggle in film noir.

This nice piece was painted by French artist Emmanuel Gaillard for Une femme dangereuse, which was originally released in 1940 as They Drive by Night. The movie, which is adapted from A. I. Bezzerides’ 1938 novel Long Haul, deals with two wildcat truckers caught in the American class struggle—you know, that thing all the millionaire pundits on television tell you doesn’t exist? The drivers want to rise above their station, but find many obstacles in their way, including leasing companies, fruit buyers, competing truckers, road accidents, injuries, fatigue, and eventually, murder. While the world-against-the-working-man aspect is interesting, the best part is watching George Raft and Humphrey Bogart play the two hard luck drivers. The movie also boasts the excellent Ann Sheridan, as well as film noir icon Ida Lupino in full-on crazy mode. But like the several trucks onscreen that veer off the road, the movie itself lurches into melodrama at the end. Une femme dangereuse had its French premiere today in 1947.

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Vintage Pulp Jun 27 2015
PARIS CONFIDENTIEL
Secrets, spies, and other tools of espionnage.


Here are a few scans from the cover and interior of Folies de Paris et de Hollywood #174, which appeared in 1960. It’s a “numéro exceptionnel,” or special issue of the magazine, and is devoted secrets and spies. All that means is that the photo features are entitled things like “Paola Mystere,” and “Le Rendez-vous Secret.” You get the usual assortment of glamour models, including Sally Douglas, who we've featured before, and lots of showgirls. We bought twenty of these a while back but have been lazy about sharing them because, well, it’s really time intensive. We have to scan each page in two halves, which already amounts to twice the normal work, then Photoshop the pieces together, which is a whole new realm of effort. But we’ll get more issues up soon. In the meantime you can our previous shares by clicking here. 

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Vintage Pulp Jun 27 2015
PORTRAIT OF A LADY
Macario Gomez shows an ability to see the bigger wicker.

A couple of years ago we shared some posters by the Spanish artist Macario Gomez, including one rather creative effort for La mansion de la niebla, aka Murder Mansion. But commercial art isn’t always about creativity. This Gomez effort for Emmanuelle, which premiered yesterday in 1974 (and we meant to post it yesterday, except we got deeply involved in a deadly combo of beachy weather and white wine), is an almost exact reproduction of the photographed French promo poster, at right.

We say almost, because you can see that Gomez, whose distinctive signature appears at middle left on the poster, put actress Sylvia Kristel in a bigger wicker chair than in the photo. Or maybe it’s rattan. Whatever, they’re known as peacock chairs, and when they appear in promo art they’re reliable signifiers that what you’re going to get is softcore or sexploitation. They especially pop up during the 1970s and early 1980s. It might even be the same chair each time. In any case, we really like this poster from Gomez. It’s nothing more than a portrait made from a photo, true, but the final product is very nice, we think. As for the movie, we talked about it a bit way back in 2008. If you’re into romantic softcore, it’s pretty much mandatory.

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Vintage Pulp Jun 24 2015
FROIDEAN SLIP
If you’re going to murder someone at least make sure they deserve it.

The above Japanese promo poster is for André Haguet’s French thriller Colère froide, which was made in 1960 and played for the first time in Japan today in 1961. Basically, the movie concerns a jealous journalist who kills his girlfriend’s previous lover. But it was really all a big misunderstanding—the journalist thought his girlfriend had been seeing her ex on the sly, but in reality she was only trying to tell him to stay out of her life forever. Oops. And then the girlfriend is accused of the murder. Double oops. The movie starred Estella Blain, Harold Kay, and Pierre-Jean Vaillard, and though it was directed by the very experienced Haguet, it’s mainly forgotten today. Nice poster, though.

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Vintage Pulp Jun 2 2015
DEATH BECOMES THEM
Spillane decides to kill everybody.

Mickey Spillane’s Dites-le avec des tueurs was published by Presses de la Cité in 1961, and comprised four stories translated into French by G. Morris-Dumoulin—“Stand Up and Die!,” “Tomorrow I Die,” “I'll Die Tomorrow,” and, just for variety, “Me, Hood!” Don’t worry, though—lots of people die in that one too. All four tales originally appeared in the American men’s magazine Cavalier, a publication that embraced writers such as Thomas Pynchon, John D. MacDonald, and Theodore Sturgeon, and was instrumental in helping launch the career of Stephen King. We really like the cover art on the above collection, but we don’t know who did it. We’ll dig into that and maybe report back later. 
 
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Vintage Pulp May 31 2015
LOW-YIELD BOND
Italian thriller offers viewers an entertaining world of trouble.


It’s probably fair to say Duello dans le monde, aka Ring Around the World has been pretty much forgotten in filmdom, but maybe it shouldn’t be. With a good premise, groovy-jazzy soundtrack, and location shooting in global hotspots like Bangkok, London, Hong Kong, and Rio de Janeiro, this was better than we had any right to expect. Richard Harrison investigates a series of seemingly natural deaths only to find that they were murders—in reality an assassin has shot the victims with pellets made of a frozen concoction that induces heart attacks. The pellets of course then melt and leave no trace behind.

We were drawn to this film by the excellent French language promo poster above painted by Giuliano Nistri, but were surprised to find a semi-competent thriller in the vein of James Bond. Interestingly, there’s a skydiving stunt here that predated the famous Moonraker opening sequence by more than a decade. The stunt isn’t exactly the same, but the idea is close, done low budget. The movie is probably too goofy and cheap to be called good, but on the whole it’s worth a look, and as a bonus it co-stars the wonderful Dominique Boschero. Originally released in Italy in 1966 and called Duello nel mondo, it opened in France as Duel dans le monde today in 1967. 
 
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Vintage Pulp May 27 2015
RUBBING ONE OUT
When Evelyn Keyes comes out of a lamp, is there really any need to wish for more?

The unusually beautiful French language poster above was made for the Belgian run of Aladin et la lampe merveilleuse, which was originally produced in the U.S. as A Thousand and One Nights. Some of the other posters for this set-in-Baghdad musical adventure are excellent too, such as the one you see at right (presumably made for the French run), but the version at top is the best—and rarest.

The art also manages to convey the mood of the movie quite accurately—it’s ninety minutes of cheeseball songs, Vaudevillian slapstick, and Cornel Wilde caught in the world’s silliest love triangle. All of this is slightly marred by the unfortunate sight of white actors hamming it up with brown shoe polish on their faces, but that's to be expected in a Middle-Eastern themed movie made during an era when actors of color were more-or-less barred from cinematic roles.

On balance, the movie is a real mood lifter, but the whole effort is just a little too stupidly sweet for us to truly call good, with a bit too much syrupy baritone crooning from Cornel Wilde (or more likely his voice double), and too much of the various love interests making cow-eyes at each other. But Evelyn Keyes as the troublemaking genie is a fun touch. She makes the movie worth it. Aladin et la lampe merveilleuse premiered in the U.S. in 1945, and played for the first time in France/Belgium today in 1949.

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Vintage Pulp May 21 2015
HOLDING THE LINE
Aslan shows his soft side.

Are these pulp? Sort of. They’re Aslan, and that’s close enough. We’re referring, of course, to French master Alain Gourdon, aka Aslan, and we’ve featured rare pieces of his that you can’t see anywhere else (so far) here and here. What you’re looking at above are covers for the magazine Line, billed as “le journal des chics filles.” These are Aslan in cutesy mode, which he always did quite well, and which presents a nice counterpoint to him in raunchy mode, at which he also excelled. We’ll do more on him in the latter incarnation in a bit. Late 1960s on all these. 

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Intl. Notebook May 20 2015
SOMMER BREEZE
She came along like a breath of fresh air.

The French editors of Stop were pretty smart. How do we know? Because they chose a twenty-year-old German ingénue named Elke Sommer to star on the cover of their debut issue in 1960. She also appeared in issues 6, 27, 31, and others. Very smart. Stop was published throughout the 1960s, and since this issue is N˚1, we’ll assume it’s unrelated to the Stop magazine, also French, that published during the 1940s. We have five more rare-ish Sommer shots below, and you can see an issue devoted to Brigitte Bardot here

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Featured Pulp
japanese themed aslan cover
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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
July 04
1927—La Lollo Is Born
Gina Lollobrigida is born in Subiaco, Italy, and eventually becomes one of the world's most famous and desired actresses. Later she becomes a photojournalist, numbering among her subjects Salvador Dali, Paul Newman and Fidel Castro.
July 03
1931—Schmeling Retains Heavyweight Title
German boxer Max Schmeling TKOs his U.S. opponent Young Stribling in the fifteenth round to retain the world heavyweight boxing title he had won in 1930. Schmeling eventually tallies fifty-six wins, forty by knockout, along with ten losses and four draws before retiring in 1948.
1969—Stones Guitarist Is Found Dead
Brian Jones, a founding member of British rock group Rolling Stones, is found at the bottom of his swimming pool at Crotchford Farm, East Sussex, England. The official cause of his death is recorded as misadventure from ingesting various drugs.
July 02
1937—Amelia Earhart Disappears
Amelia Earhart fails to arrive at Howland Island during her around the world flight, prompting a search for her and navigator Fred Noonan in the South Pacific Ocean. No wreckage and no bodies are ever found.
1964—Civil Rights Bill Becomes Law
U.S. President Lyndon Johnson signs the Civil Rights Bill into law, which makes the exclusion of African-Americans from elections, schools, unions, restaurants, hotels, bars, cinemas and other public institutions and facilities illegal. A side effect of the Bill is the immediate reversal of American political allegiance, as most southern voters abandon the Democratic Party for the Republican Party.
1997—Jimmy Stewart Dies
Beloved actor Jimmy Stewart, who starred in such films as Rear Window and Vertigo, dies at age eighty-nine at his home in Beverly Hills, California of a blood clot in his lung.

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