Vintage Pulp Apr 16 2014
PARIS WHEN IT'S GREY
Even when it’s drab it’s beautiful.

This issue of Paris Plaisirs goes back farther than any we’ve featured—to 1924. But the pulp era officially began in the late 1800s, which means this art deco influenced publication fits right in. It debuted in 1922, lasted into the late 1930s, and was published out of Rue Georges-Berger in the Plaine de Monceaux quarter, fashioning itself as a specialty publication for Parisian music halls. Though this issue is very grey, the magazine became more colorful as time went by, which you can see in our other posts. That’s about all we can tell you about Paris Plaisirs because the mastheads in these are not exactly packed with information. We’ll find out more eventually, but in the meantime we’ll just enjoy the racy photographic vignettes and many ink drawings evocative of the Jazz Age. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Apr 10 2014
ELLE OF A VIEW
Shake ya popotin, but watch yourself.

Above, a cover for Elle ondule du popotin, written by Jack Norton for Éditions Le Trotteur’s Collection Paprika and published in 1953. Norton was of course a pseudonym, in this case for Jean de Backer, who also wrote as Jacques Norton, Henry Ghils, and others. The title of this translates rather provocatively as “she sways her ass,” which is exactly what the artist seems to have been trying to depict with this femme fatale in sheer lingerie. That artist was Alex Pinon, a favorite of ours. We haven’t really begun to share his work the way we’d like, but we will, and in the meantime, if you click over to our keyholes collection from last July, you can see a few more Pinons there. By the way, “popotin”? That’s one of the funnier words for butt we’ve heard. Not great as a song lyric, but maybe we can work it into conversation sometime. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Musiquarium Apr 9 2014
SUPER BAD
If the song had been anywhere near as good as the cover art it would have sold millions.

Today we’re back to the recently deceased Aslan, aka Alain Gourdon, bringing another of his album sleeves to light. Unlike the amazing Cure bootleg we posted before, this appears to be licensed usage of Aslan’s work by the French group Super Nana for their 1987 maxi single “Lachez les chiens.” The title has something to do with dogs, apparently, which is appropriate, because this song is a bag of flaming poo. Even our fine appreciation for dance music can’t help us enjoy this awful electro disco effort. Just our opinion, though—you can listen for yourself here, if you’re inclined. We’ll have more from Aslan soon. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 30 2014
UP THE CREEK
You said we were going fishing, cherie, so I wore my fishnets.

We found this special Nus d’été (summer nudes) issue of Paris-Hollywood back in 2009, and every year on the day of the summer solstice we seem to be too otherwise occupied to post images from it. So finally this year we decided posting on the actual first day of summer is less important than simply sharing the images, so here you go—a dozen pages to warm your heart and possibly your loins. If you squint at the one just below she could almost be Ingrid Bergman. Almost. See another Paris-Hollywood special here.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 25 2014
CREAM A BALLERINA
Would you believe her name is Svetlana Carrunova?

Above, a very cool Éditions de l’Arabesque cover for Dick Barnett’s, aka Georges Heil’s, 1967 thriller Nettoyage par le vide, volume 367 of the publisher’s long running Collection Espionnage. Nettoyage par le vide means “vacuum cleaning,” which we suppose is how they’ll scrape the ballerina off the pavement once she’s flattened by that sedan. She isn’t named Carrunova, by the way, but it’d be better if she were. The art is by Jef de Wulf, who apparently despised the ballet. See more of his work by clicking his keywords below. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 10 2014
SOEURS LOSER
Don’t hurt me! Please! I can change! I’ve got another shirt in my car!

We’re keeping it French today with Paul Lorey’s La ronde de soeurs from Editions les Elfes’ mid-1960’s Espionnage ou Anticipation collection. The art, showing an unfortunate about to lose a fight with a man dressed exactly like him, is by Le Gallo. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 8 2014
SERIE DANGEREAUX
Our plan is to have none of what you see below ever happen to us.

A selection of ten amazing Elvifrance comic book/graphic novel covers, 1978 to 1982.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 7 2014
DOUBLE SHOT
Lady with a Luger (and later a Colt).

Above, the covers for George Maxwell’s Tirez à vue! and Colt en main!, aka Shoot on Sight and Colt in Hand. Maxwell is a bit of a mystery. He was born Edmond Georges Marius Esposito, wrote as Maxwell, Erynx Applegate, and perhaps other pseudonyms. These books were published by Éditions le Pont Neuf’s for their Miss Luger Collection, 1958, a series comprised only of these two entries, actually. Cover art is by unknown. These French pulp writers and artists... always so impénétrable. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Feb 9 2014
CANINE INSTINCT
This dog goes Harf Harf.

We like the work of French illustrator F. Harf, but he can be hit and miss and above you see one of his less successful covers, for Le bonheur difficile. What seems to have been difficile here was painting a dog. This is surely the world’s least convincing pooch. If it’s a dog at all. It could be a naked, neutered, armless old man. If you want to see a prettier Harf cover check here. Le bonheur difficile was published by Éditions de la Mode Nationale S.E.P.I.A. as part of their Collection Fama, and it was written by Lidone, who was in reality Marie-Madeleine Lavergne. She wrote quite a few books as Lidone, Magda Contino, Maria Mario, and Jean Namur during her thirty-year career, primarily in the romance genre. This one, also a romance, but hopefully not involving the dog faced man, is from 1956.
 
diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 9 2014
OFFENSIVE DRIVING
Okay, I’ll put it in neutral and you push. On one, two, and—whoops, had it in reverse. You alright back there?

Here’s an interesting cover for Mario Ropp’s Celle des deux qui vivait, which means “which of the two lived.” If we had to guess, we’d say it was the driver. Following standard practice for French crime authors, Ropp was actually a pseudonym for someone named Marie-Anne Devillers who wrote for twenty-seven years under various names, including Dominique Dorn, Maia Walbert, Maia de Villers, and Michèle Vaudois. The art here is by Michel Gourdon and it certainly qualifies as one of his quirkier efforts. See more Gourdon here and here. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Next Page
Featured Pulp
japanese themed aslan cover
cure bootleg by aslan
five aslan fontana sleeves
aslan trio for grand damier
ASLAN Harper Lee cover
ASLAN COVER FOr Dekobra
Four Aslan Covers for Parme
History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
April 20
1939—Holiday Records Strange Fruit
American blues and jazz singer Billie Holiday records "Strange Fruit", which is considered to be the first civil rights song. It began as a poem written by Abel Meeropol, which he later set to music and performed live with his wife Laura Duncan. The song became a Holiday standard immediately after she recorded it, and it remains one of the most highly regarded pieces of music in American history.
April 19
1927—Mae West Sentenced to Jail
American actress and playwright Mae West is sentenced to ten days in jail for obscenity for the content of her play Sex. The trial occurred even though the play had run for a year and had been seen by 325,000 people. However West's considerable popularity, already based on her risque image, only increased due to the controversy.
1971—Manson Sentenced to Death
In the U.S, cult leader Charles Manson is sentenced to death for inciting the murders of Sharon Tate and several other people. Three accomplices, who had actually done the killing, were also sentenced to death, but the state of California abolished capital punishment in 1972 and neither they nor Manson were ever actually executed.
April 18
1923—Yankee Stadium Opens
In New York City, Yankee Stadium, home of Major League Baseball's New York Yankees, opens with the Yankees beating their eternal rivals the Boston Red Sox 4 to 1. The stadium, which is nicknamed The House that Ruth Built, sees the Yankees become the most successful franchise in baseball history. It is eventually replaced by a new Yankee Stadium and closes in September 2008.

Advertise Here
Reader Pulp
It's easy. We have an uploader that makes it a snap. Use it to submit your art, text, header, and subhead. Your post can be funny, serious, or anything in between, as long as it's vintage pulp. You'll get a byline and experience the fleeting pride of free authorship. We'll edit your post for typos, but the rest is up to you. Click here to give us your best shot.

Pulp Covers
Pulp art from around the web
microbrewreviews.blogspot.com.es/2014/03/favorites-pulp-covers-gg-ficklings.html trivialitas.piranho.de/coverart/gourdona.htm
www.papy-dulaut.com/10-categorie-10641566.html thepassingtramp.blogspot.com/2014/04/woman-trouble-glance-at-da-blurbs-hard.html
ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2014/03/reform-school-art.html jef-de-wulf.blogspot.com/2009/12/essai-2.html
Pulp Advertising
Things you'd love to buy but can't anymore
PulpInternational.com Vintage Ads
Humor Blog Directory
About Email Legal RSS RSS Tabloid Femmes Fatales Hollywoodland Intl. Notebook Mondo Bizarro Musiquarium Politique Diabolique Sex Files Sportswire