Intl. Notebook May 6 2016
NEW NUDES ARE OLD NUDES
French photographer earns raves for fresh look at the nude form... except for one little thing.


Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to be impressed by those who do. Especially when it comes to art. The very nice image above was shot by Parisian photographer Dani Olivier. He has published three photo books, exhibited his pieces all over France, as well as in galleries in such places as Kiev, Moscow, and Los Angeles, and describes his work as an effort to create nude portraits “that [haven't] been shot before.” Ah, but they have been shot before, Dani, they surely have, and by one of your countrymen, no less—Fernand Fonssagrives, as we discussed here.

The photo we posted back in 2012 was one from the Fonssagrives canon that had never been seen online before, which makes it worth a gander, but for those disinclined to click over there, an example of Fonssagrives' work from 1956 appears below. Very similar, no? We have a feeling Olivier would exclaim, “But Fonssagrives' light is dots, while mine is sperm, you idiot!” Well, dots, sperm—maybe Fonssagrives' is sperm too, but seen head-on.

There's no doubting Olivier's light patterns are more varied and detailed, however Fonssagrives might have gone in a similarly precise direction had he possessed similarly superior projection technology. In any case, we love Dani Olivier’s work. But the quote about its originality caught our eye, as well as the fact that none of the articles we checked on him mentioned Fonssagrives, so we were pretty much compelled to bring up the old master, who certainly deserves his just due.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Apr 23 2016
FOLIES THE LEADER
King of the hill, top of the heap.


Owned by a publisher calling itself Sapho, Folies de Paris et de Hollywood was one of the pre-eminent pin-up magazines of the mid-century period, running from 1947 to 1975 for a total of nearly 600 issues. It also operated under other names, including Paris-Hollywood, and generated another 150 issues. Appearing this week in 1966, this issue of Folies is number 345 and features the usual assortment of showgirl portraits and write-ups. Often the magazine slipped in a model or two from outside the world of Parisian dance, and in this issue a good chunk of pages are given to British pin-ups Cleo Simmons and Penny Winters. We didn't scan all their photos—sorry. This is a big magazine, dimensionally speaking, and every page must be scanned in two pieces and merged in Photoshop—with the centerfold being scanned in four pieces and reassembled—so sometimes we don't get to all of them. But we strive to improve. Speaking of the centerfold, she's unknown to us, as is the rear cover star. If anyone knows them feel free to drop us a line. Twenty images below, and many more Folies to come.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Apr 22 2016
MALE PRIVILEGE
They reserve the right to kill everything in sight.


It's murder and mayhem in this issue of Male published this month in 1958. The carnage and gunplay span the Wild West era to World War II, and France to Xinjiang, China, with cheesecake model Diana Crawford thrown in to break up the monotony. The cover is an atypical effort from George Gross, and the interior art is by the always excellent Charles Copeland, along with Brendon Lynch, John Leone, Arthur De Kuh, and others. Looking for more Male? Click here. Or here.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Intl. Notebook Apr 19 2016
SOUND A WARNING
If you're hearing this it's already too late.

This curious photo shows a bit of pulp-era technology—the acoustic mirror or acoustic locator. It was used to detect the approach of aircraft. The examples above and below are from Japan, Finland, Russia, Sweden, and other countries, and date from the 1930s to the eve of World War II, when they were replaced by radar systems. Apparently, these worked quite well, picking up engine noise from miles away. But as aircraft became speedier the effective range of the devices decreased—enemy planes would reach the site where a mirror was located within a minute or two of being detected. At such speeds, a spotter with a good pair of binoculars and decent visibility would see the planes the same time a mirror heard them. But before airspeeds increased these were the surest way to detect an oncoming aerial attack or reconnaissance flight, particularly at night. In addition to portable mirrors, some countries used cast concrete to construct massive versions that had a twenty-mile range. Great Britain built the last set of these in 1943 when fears surfaced that the Germans had developed a means to jam radar. Built to endure weather and time, some survive and have become tourist attractions. We have ten more crazy acoustic mirror designs below for your enjoyment.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Femmes Fatales Apr 13 2016
FIRING BLANCK
Some are on the left and others are on the right, but her position on guns is right in the middle.


This image of German born French actress Dorothée Blanck appeared on the cover of France's Cinémonde magazine today in 1965. Blanck died in January at the age of 81 after decades in cinema, including roles in Jean-Luc Godard's Une femme est une femme, Jean Renoir's Elena et les hommes, and Jacques Demy's Les parapluies de Cherbourg. She came from the humblest of beginnings—born in prison in Aichach, where her mother was serving time for political crimes like numerous leftists resistant to the rising Nazis; shuttled around to various orphanages and institutions; not even given an official name for the first two years of her life. Her film career began in 1953 and, with occasional lulls, she worked often throughout her life, appearing in some forty films. Her last project, entitled Jours de France, or Days of France, is in post-production and is slated to hit cinemas sometime this year. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Sportswire Apr 2 2016
NO LAUGHING MOTTA
They didn't call him the Bronx Bull for nothing.

How much beating can a fighter take? National Police Gazette asks that burning question on the front of this issue that hit newsstands this month in 1950. The cover star is Jake LaMotta, the Bronx Bull, who was famous for being able to take a punch—or fifty—and his unseen opponent is French fighter Robert Villemain. The photo was made during their December 1949 bout, a match LaMotta lost by unanimous decision. But his reputation as someone who could take a punch grew even when he lost, and eventually reached legendary proportions. His most serious beating occurred in February 1951 during a bout with Sugar Ray Robinson that was dubbed the Saint Valentine's Day Massacre. By the end the fight had become an epic of human destruction, and almost certainly caused permanent damage to La Motta. But in ninety-five professional matches to that point he had never been knocked to the canvas and he didn't fall that night either, even during a vicious final-round barrage that had LaMotta staggering around the ring. So the answer to Gazette's question—How much beating can a fighter take?—is simple. If you're LaMotta, you can take plenty. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 23 2016
SHOE ENOUGH
Man, he had tiny feet. Suddenly it's hard to remember why I thought he was so dangerous.


Above, a Michel Gourdon cover for Serge LaForest's Les mains propres, aka Clean Hands, for Collection Special Police from French publisher Fleuve Noir. LaForest was a pseudonym used by Serge Arcouet, who wrote 140 novels as LaForest, Russ Rasher, Tony Stewart, and—we love this one—John Lee Silver. Actually, he shared Silver with two other French writers Pierre Aryaud and Léo Malet. Remember those trips to France we took? These Fleuve Noir paperbacks are staples in every secondhand bookstore you find, probably because very close to a billion have been printed and sold from 1949 until today. Les mains propres is from 1960 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 22 2016
YES WE CANCANS
Something about Paris just makes you want to dance.


This issue of Cancans de Paris, which is number 10, hit newsstands this month in 1966 featuring cover star Virginia Litz, someone we saw a while back in Folies de Paris et de Hollywood, but modeling under the pseudonym Arabelle. Litz pops up inside Cancans along with Gloria Paul, Dany Carrel, Sylvia Sorrente, and Uta Levka, as well as Sean Connery and Claudine Auger, who were starring together in Thunderball. We have Virginia Litz on at least one other mid-century magazine, which we'll post a bit later. In the meantime below are assorted scans from today's issue.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 10 2016
SOPHIA OR NOT
Folies de Paris et de Hollywood kept readers guessing with their models but this one we know.


This issue of Folies de Paris et de Hollywood is from 1963 and its theme is “les peches capiteaux,” or the seven deadly sins. You see them listed at bottom left on the cover, if you ever wanted to learn them in French. While the theme is interesting, we're sharing this cover for one reason—Sophia Loren. Well, we think it's her. Folies never credited its cover models, so we can't be sure. The editors used her image on at least three other covers, and those instances are identifiably Loren because the shots are standard portraits, leaving no doubt. But this one has an oblique angle, which is enough by itself to make positive ID more difficult. And the model is wearing a see-through blouse. For casual fans of Loren that may seem out of character, but it isn't. Her early nude scene in Era lui... sì! sì! is well known today. We've discussed it a couple of times. And of course who can forget her wet-shirt appearance in Boy on a Dolphin. The point is Loren was not shy, so the see-through lingerie here is not a sign the cover model isn't her. We're going to say this is indeed Loren until someone convinces us otherwise. Inside the magazine identities are a bit clearer. You get various Parisian showgirls, as well Vicki Kennedy, aka Margaret Nolan, who we're beginning to think may have been the most photographed glamour model of the 1960s, centerfold Terry Higgins (in a crib, disturbingly), and June Palmer as “la paresse,” or sloth—though not so slothful she wasn't able to pose for three pages of photos, then don a blonde wig and appear on the rear cover too. That's more than we did all last week. Scans below.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Mar 8 2016
BITTERSWEET SYMPHONIE
It may be a woman's gun but that just means it does the same job without being so loud and flashy about it.


Symphonie en 6.35 has one of the nicer French covers we've seen, with its tough femme fatale and outline of a 6.35 mm baby Browning pistol, which was sometimes marketed as a gun women could carry in a purse. Unfortunately the art is uncredited. We know all about the inside of the book, though. It was written by Ange Beaucaire for Éditions Hachette's Collection le Point d' Interrogation. This was Beaucaire's first novel, published in 1954, and is a detective yarn set in the Parisian underworld starring a police commissioner who must solve the murder of a retiree, and later the kidnapping and murder of the retiree's mistress. It all leads to the uncovering of a drug cartel. The book was nominated for a Prix Quai des Orfèvres, which is an award bestowed by a jury composed of not only publishing figures, but cops, judges, and crime journalists, and chaired by whoever happens to be the Director of the Paris Judicial Police at the time. So, nice honor for Beaucaire his first time out. Of course, being French he for some reason wrote under a pseudonym, and in this case the fingers tapping the typewriter actually belonged to Jacques Leblic and Olivier Séchan. The two went on to write at least two other novels. We'll see if we can dig up more info on the cover. We have a few suspicions who did it but we'll refrain from guessing for now. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Next Page
Featured Pulp
japanese themed aslan cover
cure bootleg by aslan
five aslan fontana sleeves
aslan trio for grand damier
ASLAN Harper Lee cover
ASLAN COVER FOr Dekobra
Four Aslan Covers for Parme
History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
May 25
1938—Alicante Is Bombed
During the Spanish Civil War, a squadron of Italian bombers sent by fascist dictator Benito Mussolini to support the insurgent Spanish Nationalists, bombs the town of Alicante, killing more than three-hundred people. Although less remembered internationally than the infamous Nazi bombing of Guernica the previous year, the death toll in Alicante is similar, if not higher.
1977—Star Wars Opens
George Lucas's sci-fi epic Star Wars premiers in the Unites States to rave reviews and packed movie houses. Produced on a budget of $11 million, the film goes on to earn $460 million in the U.S. and $337 million overseas, while spawning a franchise that would eventually earn billions and make Lucas a Hollywood icon.
May 24
1930—Amy Johnson Flies from England to Australia
English aviatrix Amy Johnson lands in Darwin, Northern Territory, becoming the first woman to fly from England to Australia. She had departed from Croydon on May 5 and flown 11,000 miles to complete the feat. Her storied career ends in January 1941 when, while flying a secret mission for Britain, she either bails out into the Thames estuary and drowns, or is mistakenly shot down by British fighter planes. The facts of her death remain clouded today.
May 23
1934—Bonnie and Clyde Are Shot To Death
Outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who traveled the central United States during the Great Depression robbing banks, stores and gas stations, are ambushed and shot to death in Louisiana by a posse of six law officers. Officially, the autopsy report lists seventeen separate entrance wounds on Barrow and twenty-six on Parker, including several head shots on each. So numerous are the bullet holes that an undertaker claims to have difficulty embalming the bodies because they won't hold the embalming fluid.

Advertise Here
Reader Pulp
It's easy. We have an uploader that makes it a snap. Use it to submit your art, text, header, and subhead. Your post can be funny, serious, or anything in between, as long as it's vintage pulp. You'll get a byline and experience the fleeting pride of free authorship. We'll edit your post for typos, but the rest is up to you. Click here to give us your best shot.

Pulp Covers
Pulp art from around the web
mundobocado.blogspot.com/2016/05/biblioteca-oro-de-pablo-ramirez.html aucarrefouretrange.blogspot.com/2016/01/quelques-couvertures-illutrees-par.html?zx=17306da773a78c53
deltalivres.canalblog.com/archives/2013/10/05/28152756.html glorioustrash.blogspot.com/2016/04/the-huntress.html
consumedandjudged.blogspot.com/2012/05/passion-trap-1960.html www.mysteriousbookshop.com/blogs/mysterious-bookshop-blog/97452737-all-things-mysterious-volume-twenty
Pulp Advertising
Things you'd love to buy but can't anymore
PulpInternational.com Vintage Ads
www.easternkicks.com
moscasdemantequilla.wordpress.com
filmnoirfoundation.tumblr.com
pour15minutesdamour.blogspot.com
www.pulpcurry.com
thehorrorclub.blogspot.com
mundobocado.blogspot.com
templeofschlock.blogspot.com
greenleaf-classics-books.com
aligemker-books.blogspot.com
bullesdejapon.fr
bolsilibrosblog.blogspot.com
thelastdrivein.com
derangedlacrimes.com
www.shocktillyoudrop.com
www.thesmokinggun.com
www.deadline.com
www.truecrimelibrary.co.uk
www.weirdasianews.com
salmongutter.blogspot.com
www.glamourgirlsofthesilverscreen.com
tsutpen.blogspot.com
creepingirrelevance.tumblr.com
thepulpfictionproject.blogspot.com
burleskateer.tumblr.com
www.cinemaretro.com
aucarrefouretrange.blogspot.com
eldesvandelabuelito.wordpress.com
sangreyakuza.blogspot.com
menspulpmags.com
killercoversoftheweek.blogspot.com
About Email Legal RSS RSS Tabloid Femmes Fatales Hollywoodland Intl. Notebook Mondo Bizarro Musiquarium Politique Diabolique Sex Files Sportswire