Vintage Pulp Feb 11 2018
A DOSE OF MOLLY
Marie Forså indulges in a summer of ecstasy.


Marie Forså appears above on yet another beautiful Japanese promo, this time for Molly, aka Sex in Sweden, a sexploitation flick based—very loosely we think—on Moll Flanders. The only similarity seems to be that the main character is away from home (in the Côte d'Azur, poor tortured thing) and undergoes a sexual awakening. The version we watched was fully hardcore, with scenes performed by Anne Magle and others. Forså's sex scene is shot with a body double, which is a little strange considering she already had an x-rated magazine spread to her credit, but it was a very obscure Swedish publication, which is a whole different ball game, so to speak, from doing the same for international cinema audiences. Without her sex scene and the several others scattered at intervals Molly would be maybe 40 minutes long, and that should tell you exactly what to expect in terms of plot—dubious Moll Flanders connection notwithstanding.

We usually post screenshots or production stills when we write about a film, but we won't bother with that here because our copy's image quality was blurrier than your vision after several hits of the aforementioned ecstasy. Instead we decided to share the below image of Forså. It's rare, and with Forså covering her furry bits it reminds us of the many Japanese promos we've uploaded. We think it's a beautiful shot, but others—possibly our girlfriends among them—may disagree. Well, if they have any serious objections about our website it's way too late to register them now. We're going to talk about one more of Forså's movies before consigning her to the completed bin, so look for that a bit later. You can see our other posts on her movies by clicking her keywords at bottom. Molly opened in Sweden in 1977 and premiered in Japan today in 1978.

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Hollywoodland Feb 11 2018
SONG AND DANCE
Abbe Lane wiggles it just a little bit.


When we saw this National Enquirer cover our first thought was: “She was famous for wiggling?” We did a search and found that famed singer Abbe Lane was indeed known for her shimmy, and thanks to the magic of technology we found footage of her doing exactly that. They're pretty sedate moves by today's standards, but we guess they inflamed imaginations to dangerous levels back in February 1962, when this Enquirer hit newsstands. We have some other nice Lane photos you can see, if you're interested. Full disclosure: they don't wiggle, but they still look nice.

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Vintage Pulp Feb 10 2018
YOU CAN'T HANDLE THE TROUPE
We're here for the West Side Story audition. And you better understand this right now—we intend to nail it.


We've talked before about the amazing Harlan Ellison. We came to know him as an unparalleled sci-fi writer, but later discovered he was also a juvenile delinquency author. These gang stories were obscure curiosities for us, but through running Pulp Intl. we've since learned that Ellison's juvie fiction is a much discussed and much collected part of his output. Above you see the rare 1958 Pyramid Books edition of his first novel Rumble, later published as Web of the City, with an amazing cover by Spanish artist Rudy De Reyna. Consider this an Ellison trial run that made it into the light of day. Anyone familiar with him knows this will be a strange and violent tale, but the craftsman who gave the world stories like “All the Birds Come Home To Roost” is not yet in evidence. Plotwise, the protagonist Rusty is leader of a street gang and wants out while he's still young enough to make something of his life. Quitting is a savage and harrowing ordeal. Staying out is impossible thanks to his little sister, whose involvement with the gang pulls Rusty back into the life. Ellison is a guy who once claimed he never revised his work. That isn't true because Rumble was cut down and cleaned up by him, and became Web of the City. Everyone says the revised version is much better. Without having read it, we suspect they're right. 

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Femmes Fatales Feb 10 2018
HER MOVE
Knight shoots pawn—check and mate.


Patricia Knight made only five motion pictures, but one of them was 1949's Shockproof, which falls into the category of under appreciated film noir. She plays an ex-convict who moves in with her parole officer. Yeah—bad idea, but no need to say more because we already talked about the film in detail. Check here. Knight married her Shockproof co-star Cornel Wilde and, except for a few more roles, that was pretty much the end of her career. But her contribution to film noir is remembered as one of the better ones. This is a promo photo from the movie, 1949.

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Hollywoodland Feb 8 2018
A WHOLE NEWMAN
Sometimes a great notion becomes a perfect photo op.


Above is an image of Paul Newman made while filming the 1970 drama Sometimes a Great Notion. The shot was placed atop a grid background and distributed as a gatefold poster in a 1976 issue of the Japanese pop culture magazine Roadshow. We love this thing. The magazine editors flipped the negative and colored in the dirt bike's number plate, which is why it looks like “EI” instead of 13, but whichever way you look at the shot, Newman seems to be staring off into the distance and thinking, “I wonder if there's anyone on this planet remotely as cool as I am?” Then he goes, “Naaah!” and sends up a rooster tail of loose dirt as he rockets away. He rode the bike for a scene in Great Notion, but if you plan to watch the movie be forewarned it's adapted from a Ken Kesey novel about loggers, and has little to do with racing. That said, it's a pretty good flick and the novel is killer. As is this promo. Japanese promos in magazines like Screen and Roadshow are often amazing and this one follows in the tradition. Wanna see what we mean? Look here and here.

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Vintage Pulp Feb 7 2018
FAMILY PLOT
If anybody can recover the ancestral farm it's Mari.


Zoku Imokinchaku*, for which you see the poster above and which premiered in Japan today in 1970, was the sequel to the previous year's Imokinchaku, but shot in color. Atsumi plays a high school girl named Hamako who tries to save enough money to buy her family's ancestral land. Her plan to obtain it through work seems sound enough, but trouble in finances and love, including the theft of her money and a doomed infatuation with a dreamboat who happens to be gay, present serious obstacles. Of course, if the previous film taught Mari anything it was to persevere, and she makes forays into nude modeling and singing in efforts to cobble together a sufficiently large nest egg to buy the land. Do any of these schemes actually work? You'll have to add this one to your queue if you want to find out.
 
On a related note, we learned that Daiei Co. released an Atsumi record in conjunction with this film, and that it also engineered the publication of a photo book. Cross promotion of pinku films was a common tactic back then. In fact, many stars performed live in cinemas between double features, either singing, dancing, or reenacting bits from the films. Japanese law was strict about nudity onscreen, but we've been told these live performances sometimes featured full nudity, which is interesting to contemplate. Atsumi made a lot of public appearances. Below, for example, she's in Shimizu Park in Chiba, where a gaggle of photographers shot pictures of her in her undies. We have images from another Atsumi public appearance we'll share later.

*We can't find a romanized title for this film anywhere, but Zoku Imokinchaku is probably right. It's at least close. If anyone wants to correct us feel free. The official title is 続・いそぎんちゃく.  

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Vintage Pulp Feb 7 2018
MOVING VIOLATIONS
Nikkatsu pushes the envelope of taste—and social responsibility—with Okasu!


Above, a poster for the roman porno flick Okasu!, which premiered in Japan today in 1976. The title here, in a rare occurrence and complete contrast to the above film, translates directly—Rape! Considering that hundreds of roman porno (short for “romantic porno”) movies were made by Nikkatsu Studios during the ’70s and ’80s we take them seriously and seek to understand them. So we watched this and... we don't understand. Starring Natsuko Yashiro, who you may remember from her female diver movies, and co-starring Naomi Tani and Yuri Yamashina, Okasu! is the story of a rape victim who develops an obsession for her attacker and searches the city for him, constantly exposing herself to similar dangers.
 
To be clear, we make no cultural judgments here—around the same time in the U.S. on the soap opera General Hospital, Luke raped Laura and became the number one hunk on daytime television. So we're not failing to understand Okasu! from a cultural vantage point, but from a generational vantage point. We don't find non-consensual anything sexy. From our perspective this dubious flick has only two plusses: there's a highly ironic, even grimly comical, ending; and Yashiro masturbates with a walnut, which we never knew was possible. Wanna try it? Follow her lead below. But when you're making your way through vintage Japanese movies give this one a pass.

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Vintage Pulp Feb 6 2018
LOCKED IN
French publisher Editions Ferenczi had a Verrou unique way of doing things.


Collection le Verrou (The Lock Collection) consisted of 205 pocket-sized crime novels published in France by Editions Ferenczi from 1950 to 1959. Some were written by French authors using pseudonyms that sounded English or American, while other writers used their real names, such as Alexandra Pecker (yes, that's a real name) and René Poupon (idem). Other books were written by U.S. or British writers and had been previously published. For instance, above you see Le singe de cuivre by Harry Whittington, which you might know as The Brass Monkey, and below you'll find entries from Lawrence Blochman and English scribe Peter Cheney, better known as Peter Cheyney. The art on these books is generally quite colorful. The cover above was painted by Michel Gourdon, and below you'll find another piece from him, many efforts from Georges Sogny, and a couple from as-yet-unknowns. We really like Ferenczi's output, so expect us to share more covers from this publisher later.

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Vintage Pulp Feb 5 2018
NO KIDDING
We suspect what was outlawed was Howard Hughes' directorial career.


The Outlaw is reputed to be a terrible movie. Since it premiered today in 1943 we thought we'd give it a glance, and guess what? It's terrible. Howard Hughes directed it when he still fancied himself a man with artistic talent, and the main takeaway is that the Dunning-Kruger Effect is more than just a theory. His adoration of Jane Russell radiates from each of her scenes, but in overall execution the movie flops in every area except infuriating the era's movie censors. It's accidentally funny, though.

Billy the Kid: “Doc, if you're not already fixed up you can bunk with me tonight.”

Doc Holliday: “No thanks, Billy. I've got a girl. She and her aunt just moved in town. You got a girl, Billy?”

Billy the Kid: “Naw. I ain't got nothin'. Except that horse.”

On the other hand, the film is also terribly unfunny. Wikipedia says it's implied that Billy rapes Jane Russell's character Rio McDonald in a barn. We're here to tell you it may be implied visually and in the dialogue that drifts out of those obscuring shadows, but as a matter of plot it's a dead certainty that's what happens. And she's his friend's lady, the one discussed in the above dialogue exchange. Billy is just a bad guy. But you know exactly what happens next, right? Rio falls in love with Billy. But he remains a dick:

Rio McDonald: “What are you waiting for? Go ahead.”

Billy the Kid: “Say that sounds real nice. I like to hear you ask for it. Beg some more.”

Rio McDonald: “What would you like me to say?”

Billy the Kid: “Well you might say please very sweetly.”

Rio McDonald: “Please.”

Billy the Kid: “Will you keep your eyes open?”

Rio McDonald: “Yes.”

Billy the Kid: “Will you look right at me while I do it?”

The music alone during that scene could drive you from the room. And what does Billy do to Rio after he's had his way with her yet again? Ties her by her wrists and ankles and leaves her in the hot sun to roast to death. Holliday rescues her and opines that Billy must really be in love with her to do something so cruel. Um... okay. This is another great exchange:

Billy the Kid: “I think I'd rather have that cuckoo clock do the counting for me.”

Doc Holliday: “Yeah that's good enough. It's gonna strike in a minute.”

Billy the Kid: “Shall we pull on the last cuckoo?
 
We're pretty sure Hughes was pulling on his cuckoo when he made this, but luckily he never directed again. Amazingly, even though the film is awful, everything associated with it is collectible, including the promo poster above, which if you wanted to buy would cost you $56,000. Not the original painting. An original print. At least that's what one ambitious soul is asking for it. We suspect the separation between the quality of The Outlaw and the cost of its memorabilia is the largest of any film in American history. Watch it if you dare.

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Vintage Pulp Feb 5 2018
RUNNING FOR CONGRESS
“Why not walk to work?” I said. “The weather is nice and the Senate isn't far,” I said. “Maybe I'll chat with a few constituents,” I said...

Above, an entry in the long running set of thrillers and mysteries published by Amalgamated Press, Ltd. under the umbrella of The Sexton Blake Library between 1930 and 1960. This one by John Drummond is number 240, appeared in bookstores in 1950, and illustrates (to us at least) the danger involved when a politician has the momentary delusion he is anything more than the sock puppet of billionaires and corporations. One way or another this will be the last time he doesn't take his armored limousine. 

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
February 17
1933—Blaine Act Passes
The Blaine Act, a congressional bill sponsored by Wisconsin senator John J. Blaine, is passed by the U.S. Senate and officially repeals the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution, aka the Volstead Act, aka Prohibition. The repeal is formally adopted as the 21st Amendment to the Constitution on December 5, 1933.
1947—Voice of America Begins Broadcasting into U.S.S.R.
The state radio channel known as Voice of America and controlled by the U.S. State Department, begins broadcasting into the Soviet Union in Russian with the intent of countering Soviet radio programming directed against American leaders and policies. The Soviet Union responds by initiating electronic jamming of VOA broadcasts.
February 16
1937—Carothers Patents Nylon
Wallace H. Carothers, an American chemist, inventor and the leader of organic chemistry at DuPont Corporation, receives a patent for a silk substitute fabric called nylon. Carothers was a depressive who for years carried a cyanide capsule on a watch chain in case he wanted to commit suicide, but his genius helped produce other polymers such as neoprene and polyester. He eventually did take cyanide—not in pill form, but dissolved in lemon juice—resulting in his death in late 1937.
February 15
1933—Franklin Roosevelt Survives Assassination Attempt
In Miami, Florida, Giuseppe Zangara attempts to shoot President-elect Franklin D. Roosevelt, but is restrained by a crowd and, in the course of firing five wild shots, hits five people, including Chicago, Illinois Mayor Anton J. Cermak, who dies of his wounds three weeks later. Zangara is quickly tried and sentenced to eighty years in jail for attempted murder, but is later convicted of murder when Cermak dies. Zangara is sentenced to death and executed in Florida's electric chair.
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