Vintage Pulp Apr 23 2016
King of the hill, top of the heap.

Owned by a publisher calling itself Sapho, Folies de Paris et de Hollywood was one of the pre-eminent pin-up magazines of the mid-century period, running from 1947 to 1975 for a total of nearly 600 issues. It also operated under other names, including Paris-Hollywood, and generated another 150 issues. Appearing this week in 1966, this issue of Folies is number 345 and features the usual assortment of showgirl portraits and write-ups. Often the magazine slipped in a model or two from outside the world of Parisian dance, and in this issue a good chunk of pages are given to British pin-ups Cleo Simmons and Penny Winters. We didn't scan all their photos—sorry. This is a big magazine, dimensionally speaking, and every page must be scanned in two pieces and merged in Photoshop—with the centerfold being scanned in four pieces and reassembled—so sometimes we don't get to all of them. But we strive to improve. Speaking of the centerfold, she's unknown to us, as is the rear cover star. If anyone knows them feel free to drop us a line. Twenty images below, and many more Folies to come.


Vintage Pulp Mar 6 2015
Americans may have perfected the art, but the French got there first.

During the last few months we shared three Technicolor lithographs with glassine overlays of clothing that could be peeled back to reveal a nude model, and mentioned we thought the technique originated in France with Paris-Hollywood, a cover of which you see above. The magazine began publishing déshabillable—i.e. undressable—pin-ups in 1950, whereas the American undressables we’ve found date from no earlier than 1953. Though Statesiders may have been latecomers to the party, once they got the technique down they churned overlay pin-ups out by the hundreds. You can see three here, here, and here, and we’ll share more later.

The artist responsible for painting the centerfold in this issue of Paris-Hollywood was Roger Brard, and he was the brush for most of those the magazine featured, but at least one other artist was involved too. Elsewhere in the issue you get showgirls, showgirls, and more showgirls, including a three page spread on la vagabonde Cirque Z dancer and world traveler Katrina, a Venice carnival-inspired set involving a model wearing a lace mask (she also gets the back cover), and a weird photo essay with knives and six-shooters. All of this is from 1952. We have twenty scans below, and you can see many more issues of Paris-Hollywood by clicking its keywords at the bottom of this post.


Vintage Pulp Jan 29 2015
Everybody who was anybody got inside.

Above and below, scans from the French show-biz and showgirl magazine Paris-Hollywood, issue 26, from 1948. The front cover features Marguerite Chapman, the rear Arlene Dahl, and in between you get Cyd Charisse, Patricia Roc, Martha Vickers, Alexis Smith, Anne Jeffreys, Luce Feyrer, Edwige Feuillère, Marlene Dietrich, and other luminaries. That's quite a collection of celebs. In upcoming years the magazine would spend more time on cabaret dancers, but its early issues were all about international stars. We picked up a few of these in Paris a while back and we’ll get to some detailed scans of those soon. In the meantime, you can see more from Paris-Hollywood here, here, and here.


Intl. Notebook Oct 10 2014
Bargains are few when the best flea market in Paris becomes the trendiest, but there's always hope for pulp diggers.

Vintage book seekers in Paris often focus their efforts on Le Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen, or the Saint-Ouen Flea Market. Operating since 1870, as you see in the vintage postcard above, the seventeen-acre site is located north of the 18th arrondissment, outside the Boulevard Périphérique encompassing the historic center of the city. Here thousands of vendors sell every item imaginable—furniture, board games, musical instruments, électrodomestiques, vinyl records, jewelry, art and more. There are also many cafés on site, and the combination of all this makes the market a popular destination. If you’re headed to Paris we recommend the place. Some unfavorable reviews focus on the prices, which we agree are not low, but this is less a true flea market than a rarities market—i.e., bargains are thin on the ground. But for pulp diggers it’s nice. Even sellers who don’t specialize in vintage publications sometimes keep a stash of books and magazines around because they’re just the sort of low cost items that bring browsers into the stalls.

Also on the subject of reviews, we saw some suggesting the market is unsafe. You have to scratch your head at some people’s fears. 120,000 people visit the Saint-Ouen during its busiest weekends and in no part of it could you manage to be more than twenty feet from other shoppers. It’s possible pickpockets may lurk, but that's true in any crowded spotin any big city in any country. Take the standard precautions, and then enjoy yourself—that's the only advice needed here. Oh, and bring good shoes. If this is indeed a flea market—disputed, as we mentioned earlier—then it's the largest in the world.

So, what did we buy? We came across a huge stack of Paris-Hollywood magazines, several tattered issues of Ciné-Revue, and plenty of old books. Budget mattered, but luckily the books and magazines were reasonably priced and every vendor we interacted with bargained willingly, even cheerfully. In the end we managed several good purchases, supplemented by crisp digital photos of the covers of items we couldn’t afford to acquire. A tweak in Photoshop and they’re almost as good as scans. We’ll share all of those in upcoming days.


Vintage Pulp Jun 13 2014
Lana Turner makes a splash.

We’ve shared five or six Paris-Hollywood magazines, including a few last year, but it’s been since 2012 that we found an issue with one of its trademark déshabillable—or undressable—centerfolds. Not surprising, since the magazine featured them for only a year or so. Anyway, we have an especially charming one inside this 1950 issue, painted by pin-up master Roger Brard, whose clever work we’ve shown you before. The issue also has an unrecognizable photo-illustration or painting of Lana Turner playing with soapsuds on the cover. We’d never have thought it was her, but it says so at lower right. Ten scans below, and more issues if you follow the links starting with this one. 


Vintage Pulp Mar 30 2014
You said we were going fishing, cherie, so I wore my fishnets.

We found this special Nus d’été (summer nudes) issue of Paris-Hollywood back in 2009, and every year on the day of the summer solstice we seem to be too otherwise occupied to post images from it. So finally this year we decided posting on the actual first day of summer is less important than simply sharing the images, so here you go—a dozen pages to warm your heart and possibly your loins. If you squint at the one just below she could almost be Ingrid Bergman. Almost. See another Paris-Hollywood special here.


Vintage Pulp Dec 21 2013
We’ve heard of freezing your ass off but this is ridiculous.

It’s been awhile since we shared a Paris-Hollywood, so today in honor of the first day of winter we have one of their themed issues—Nus d’Hiver, or Nudes of Winter—and we can’t help but notice that the only model photographed outdoors appears to have frozen her bush off. Well, they say you have to sacrifice for art, so kudos to her. Seventeen scans below. Wanna see more? Click keywords "Paris-Hollywood" at the bottom of the post. Stay warm everyone.


Vintage Pulp Apr 20 2012
Start spreading the nus.

The French erotic magazine Paris-Hollywood regularly printed themed issues and you're looking at the cover of one above, "Nus Couleurs," which appeared in 1951. It's a 28-page collection of color nude photos, shot with typical French panache. Below are scans of our favorite images. Also, we managed to locate a couple of other Paris-Hollywood themed issues, so look for those down the line.  


Vintage Pulp Feb 3 2012
Bringing up the rear.

Paris Hollywood #108 gets playful its cover text where it says “derrière le rideau,” which means “behind the curtain.” If you glance below at Roger Brard's pin-up déshabillable, she’s behind a curtain, showing her behind. So, derrière le rideau is sort of a cute way of... Er, or maybe they didn’t mean it that way at all. Anyway, more scans below, including the rear cover featuring a cabaret dancer with the great name of Nilka. Sounds like a chocolate drink, don’t you think? 1951, on all of this. See more wonderful Roger Brard pieces by clicking his keyword below.


Vintage Pulp Sep 14 2011
The garden of Earthly delights.

Above, the covers and centerfold of Paris-Hollywood #119, published 1951. The covers consist of two photographs from the series “La vallée de la soif” by Jacques Le Chevallier, and the centerfold déshabillable—i.e. it undresses—is by Carols, who was actually Raymond Brenot under a pseudonym. See another Carols here, and three more undressing centerfolds by Roger Brard here, here, and here. 


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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
October 26
1951—Churchill Becomes Prime Minster Again
The Conservative Party wins the British general election, making Winston Churchill prime minister for the second time. Churchill is nearly 76 at the time, making him the second oldest prime minister in history after William Gladstone. Churchill remains PM until 1955, when he steps down at 81 due to ill health.
1964—The Night Caller Is Executed
In Australia, Eric Edgar Cooke, who had earned the nickname Night Caller, is hanged after being convicted of murder. He had terrorized Perth for four years, committing 22 violent crimes, eight of which resulted in deaths. He becomes the last person to be executed in Western Australia.
October 25
1938—Archbishop Denounces Dance Music
The Archbishop of Dubuque, Francis J. L. Beckman, makes headlines in the U.S. when he attacks swing music as a degenerated musical system destined to gnaw away at the moral fiber of young people. His denouncement follows on the heels of the music being banned in Germany due to its African and Jewish origins.
1993—Vincent Price Dies
American actor Vincent Price, who had achieved the height of his fame acting in low budget horror movies, and became famous again as the macabre voice in Michael Jackson's song "Thriller," dies at age 82 of complications from emphysema and Pariknson's disease.
October 24
1929—Stock Market Crashes
Black Thursday, a catastrophic crash on the New York Stock Exchange, occurs when the value of stocks suddenly declines and continues to decline for a month. The event leads to a subsequent crash in world stock prices and precipitates the Great Depression. This after famous economist Irving Fisher had declared that stock prices had reached a permanently high plateau.

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