Vintage Pulp Mar 12 2014
SUICIDAL TENDENCIES
When it comes to suicide there’s nothing like the real thing.


It’s been a few months, so we’re bringing Hitler back on The National Police Gazette. This example from March 1951 is the twenty-first Hitler cover we’ve located, all of them from the 1950s and 1960s, which means he starred for the Gazette at least yearly for two decades. But of course, that’s just an average based on the issues we’ve found so far. We know for certain there were others, and ultimately we’ll probably determine that he was featured closer to twice a year. As you can see yourself, this time Gazette is concerned with Hitler’s fake suicide, which journo Harvey Wilson says was propaganda put out by the Soviets to cover for their failure to capture him as Berlin burned.

Leaving aside the question of who’s really doing the propagandizing here, it’s a clever little pivot by the Gazette, which went from merely claiming Hitler had escaped to blaming the escape on Moscow, resulting in a nifty mash-up of two of post-War America’s biggest boogeymen—Hitler and Khrushchev. Later the Gazette would claim Hitler or his henchmen were tight with other enemies of the American power elite, including Abdel Nasser and Juan Peron. One year after the above issue came out, Gazette turned around and in its May 1952 issue, at right, blamed Hitler’s escape on the Allies. And let's not forget the infamous Hitler-in-Antarctica story, truly one of the all-time creative highlights of mid-century tabloid journalism. Well, wherever Hitler fled, the Gazette’ll straighten it out for us in due time. We just have to keep digging up issues. Meanwhile, a couple of scans below, and more from the Gazette to come.


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Intl. Notebook Feb 15 2014
SNOWBALL EFFECT
Winning is all about momentum.


We’re interested in World War II propaganda posters, and this 1942 piece from the U.S. Office of War Information is a fine example. It depicts Hitler, Mussolini and Hirohito being chased down by a snowball representing runaway U.S. industrial production. Every country involved in the war produced propaganda, some more effectively than others, and often it was racist in nature, as you see with the Hirohito image here. For an international collection check out our previous post on this subject here.

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Intl. Notebook Jan 23 2014
SWINGING ADOLF
During World War II anyone could put Hitler on the ropes.

We’ve run across some unusual World War II memorabilia over the years, but this might be the quirkiest item we’ve seen. Pretty much self-explanatory, it’s morale boosting anti Hitler propaganda in the form of a die-cut effigy. He could be used as a bookmark, or a lamp pull, or—in the case of the lucky duck who sold this trinket online for a serious windfall—not used at all so that it would be in A1 condition for the auction market decades later. It was produced by a company in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, and came complete with a tiny piece of rope to make hanging it easy for the buyer. Morbid but amazing.

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Vintage Pulp Oct 4 2013
MOUNT WISHMORE
For the first time a rocky relationship sounds like a good thing.

Above is another Technicolor pin-up for your enjoyment—or five pin-ups, to be precise. Is it just us, or do they sort of make you think of Mount Rushmore, plus one? Probably it’s just us. Some background on this: after World War II the traditional pin-up market of stylized color paintings by talented artists such as Varga and Gil Elvgren had declined, which prompted several calendar companies to try to breathe new life into the format by using actual naked women. They opted for Technicolor because it resembled the classic paintings to which buyers were accustomed, but with the added thrill only real flesh-and-blood could provide. This lithograph is entitled Garden of Charm, and indeed these five anonymous curly-haired models make a charming tableau. They were photographed in 1955.

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Intl. Notebook Aug 29 2013
NOW YOU SE IT
They may have looked like a match made in heaven, but their marriage was hell.

Se was founded in 1938 and was Sweden’s first photo magazine, basically repackaging the Life and Look formula. In fact “se” means “look” or “see” in Swedish. During World War II (during which Sweden was neutral) the magazine became a leading voice against Nazism and Swedish Nazi-appeasers. The 1970s saw its circulation dip, and the editorial staff turned toward nude images as a way to maintain market share. The magazine finally closed down in 1981. Se made Marilyn Monroe its cover star numerous times, and the above issue featuring Monroe and her new husband Joe DiMaggio appeared in early 1954. Monroe and DiMaggio had a turbulent marriage, and a short one—274 days after the wedding she filed for divorce on the grounds of mental cruelty. Several sources claim that DiMaggio was violent toward Monroe. We were able to dig up several covers from the years 1954 to 1957, which you see below. We’re interested in this publication and so we’ll try to buy some full issues to share later. 

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Vintage Pulp | Politique Diabolique Aug 19 2013
POLICE REWIND
The National Police Gazette claims Nasser said yessir to fugitive Nazis.


This month in 1961 The National Police Gazette put Adolf Hitler on its cover yet again. We don’t know how many times he appeared there, but this makes the twentieth issue we’ve found and posted. When last we left der Führer he was hiding out in either Argentina or Antarctica, but according to Gazette scribe Harvey Wilson, Hitler was directing his minions as they launched a new Nazi empire in Egypt. Wilson tells readers that Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser’s government was populated by ex-SS officers, that the secret police was being run by Joachim Damling, former head of the Gestapo in Düsseldorf, that there were Egyptian versions of the Hitler Youth, that the economy was being reorganized to a Nazi model, and a vast military machine was being built.

So, is any of this true? Well, many Nazis fled to Egypt at the end of World War II, probably many hundreds, including Aribert Heim, who was known as Dr. Death, and Nazi propagandist Johann Von Leers, who converted to Islam and took a high post at Egypt’s foreign ministry. However, fleeing Nazis ended up settling in many countries, including the U.S. Among those were Otto Von Bolschwing, who in Germany had helped develop a blueprint to purge the country of Jews and later worked for the CIA, and Arthur L. Rudolph, who helped the Nazis build the V-2 rocket and other weapons and eventually ended up being honored by NASA—twice.

In any case, this is an example of what makes tabloids so interesting to us. Some stories—like the one about Hitler living in Antarctica—are patently ridiculous, while others have at least a kernel of truth. The thrust of this story is largely true—Nazis did flee to Egypt, and manywere welcomed by the government. As for the rest of the story—Nasser did indeed reorganize Egypt’s economy and reshape its military sector, but we can’t confirm that it was due to Nazi influence. And we also can’t confirm the claims about Egyptian Hitler Youth and Joachim Damling, but even if parts of the story were wrong, a tabloid doesn’t need many victories to establish credibility in the eyes of its readership—it just needs a few big ones. On that score you have to give the Gazette credit—it said there were Nazis in Egypt and it was right.

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Vintage Pulp Aug 16 2013
REASONABLE DOUBT
The truth of a man is always revealed by the shape of the shadow he casts.

Above, a Swedish poster for Alfred Hitchcock’s psychological thriller Skuggan av ett tvivel, staring Joseph Cotten and Teresa Wright, and originally released in the U.S. as Shadow of a Doubt. The Swedish premiere of the movie was today in 1943, which might be a surprising fact for some, considering the ongoing calamity that was World War II, but Sweden was neutral during the conflict—or perhaps a better way to phrase it is to say it was occasionally helpful to both the Axis and Allies. Anyway, this is an excellent poster that tells the entire story of the film—an outwardly normal man is really a monster, and in the art casts a misshapen shadow that only one young, intuitive woman can see. The line across the top says, “One of Hitchcock’s best!” Of course, he would rise to even greater heights during the 1950s and 1960s, but some still regard this as top five Hitchcock. Us? Not so much, but see it and judge for yourself.

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Vintage Pulp Aug 8 2013
MAX CAPACITY
Hundreds of novels made him the top Brand in pulp westerns.

National Road Books sent us the covers of five Max Brand westerns and mentioned that they were for sale on the website. We ventured over there and were surprised to find that they were six dollars for the lot, which is a pretty sweet deal for one of the most popular and successful American writers of his era. At one point Brand, née Frederick Faust, earned $3,000 a week, which was a year’s salary for an average worker during the 1930s. When World War II broke out, he wanted to do his part, and finagled a front line correspondent gig in Italy. In May 1944 he died after sustaining critical shrapnel wounds, but his legacy was secure—he had written 25 to 30 million words, 500 novels, and along the way created the characters Dr. Kildare and Destry. We’d order the books ourselves if the international shipping wasn’t guaranteed to kill the savings for us. But for folks in the States they’re a great deal. 

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Intl. Notebook Jul 30 2013
TENNESSEE POP
Nothing says refreshment like deadly air power.

Something a little different today, above is a poster produced by the American soft drink brand Pop Kola touting their beverage as the biggest thirst value under the sun. Though this poster uses a World War II motif, the brand was launched as a subsidiary of Hub City Bottling Works in Jackson, Tennessee way back in 1919, and seems to have survived at least into the early 1970s. We only know the latter because we came across a newspaper story about Pop Kola sponsoring NASCAR star James Hylton during his last year as a full-time professional racer in 1972. He was excited about the partnership, calling it the best deal he ever had. As far as how far beyond 1972 Pop Kola lasted, we don’t know. It was a bit before our time. In any case, we always enjoy WWII memorabilia, and this poster featuring the elegant, gull-winged Corsair fighter plane caught our eye. It seems like an aggressive image for selling soda, but we’re sure it was well received at the time. 

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Vintage Pulp May 28 2013
MALAYS AND ANXIETY
Example of Malaysian cover art from 1959 isn’t classically pulp, but we’ll take it.

Here’s something we found that’s a bit different than usual. It’s a copy of Nyawa di-hujong Pedang, which we gather is a pretty famous book written by a pretty famous author (Ahmad Murad Nasruddin). In English it’s called Life at the End of the Sword, it’s about the struggle against Japanese aggression circa World War II, and the year of publication was originally 1946, with this edition appearing in 1959. Perhaps the art doesn’t perfectly fit the definition of pulp, but it is international and since it’s as close to pulp as we’ve ever seen out of Malaysia we’ll expand our parameters a bit to squeeze it into the website. The art is signed, but we can’t decipher the artist’s scrawl. As a side note, you may remember we shared two amazing items from Malaysia a while back. If you missed those, they’re something you should see, and they reside here and here. We’ll have a few more Malaysian tidbits later.

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History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
April 23
1986—Otto Preminger Dies
Austro–Hungarian film director Otto Preminger, who directed such eternal classics as Laura, Anatomy of a Murder, Carmen Jones, The Man with the Golden Arm, and Stalag 17, and for his efforts earned a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame, dies in New York City, aged 80, from cancer and Alzheimer's disease.
1998—James Earl Ray Dies
The convicted assassin of American civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., petty criminal James Earl Ray, dies in prison of hepatitis aged 70, protesting his innocence as he had for decades. Members of the King family who supported Ray's fight to clear his name believed the U.S. Government had been involved in Dr. King's killing, but with Ray's death such questions became moot.
April 22
1912—Pravda Is Founded
The newspaper Pravda, or Truth, known as the voice of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, begins publication in Saint Petersburg. It is one of the country's leading newspapers until 1991, when it is closed down by decree of then-President Boris Yeltsin. A number of other Pravdas appear afterward, including an internet site and a tabloid.
1983—Hitler's Diaries Found
The German magazine Der Stern claims that Adolf Hitler's diaries had been found in wreckage in East Germany. The magazine had paid 10 million German marks for the sixty small books, plus a volume about Rudolf Hess's flight to the United Kingdom, covering the period from 1932 to 1945. But the diaries are subsequently revealed to be fakes written by Konrad Kujau, a notorious Stuttgart forger. Both he and Stern journalist Gerd Heidemann go to trial in 1985 and are each sentenced to 42 months in prison.
April 21
1918—The Red Baron Is Shot Down
German WWI fighter ace Manfred von Richthofen, better known as The Red Baron, sustains a fatal wound while flying over Vaux sur Somme in France. Von Richthofen, shot through the heart, manages a hasty emergency landing before dying in the cockpit of his plane. His last word, according to one witness, is "Kaputt." The Red Baron was the most successful flying ace during the war, having shot down at least 80 enemy airplanes.
1964—Satellite Spreads Radioactivity
An American-made Transit satellite, which had been designed to track submarines, fails to reach orbit after launch and disperses its highly radioactive two pound plutonium power source over a wide area as it breaks up re-entering the atmosphere.

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