Vintage Pulp Mar 12 2014
SUICIDAL TENDENCIES
When it comes to suicide there’s nothing like the real thing.


It’s been a few months, so we’re bringing Hitler back on The National Police Gazette. This example from March 1951 is the twenty-first Hitler cover we’ve located, all of them from the 1950s and 1960s, which means he starred for the Gazette at least yearly for two decades. But of course, that’s just an average based on the issues we’ve found so far. We know for certain there were others, and ultimately we’ll probably determine that he was featured closer to twice a year. As you can see yourself, this time Gazette is concerned with Hitler’s fake suicide, which journo Harvey Wilson says was propaganda put out by the Soviets to cover for their failure to capture him as Berlin burned.

Leaving aside the question of who’s really doing the propagandizing here, it’s a clever little pivot by the Gazette, which went from merely claiming Hitler had escaped to blaming the escape on Moscow, resulting in a nifty mash-up of two of post-War America’s biggest boogeymen—Hitler and Khrushchev. Later the Gazette would claim Hitler or his henchmen were tight with other enemies of the American power elite, including Abdel Nasser and Juan Peron. One year after the above issue came out, Gazette turned around and in its May 1952 issue, at right, blamed Hitler’s escape on the Allies. And let's not forget the infamous Hitler-in-Antarctica story, truly one of the all-time creative highlights of mid-century tabloid journalism. Well, wherever Hitler fled, the Gazette’ll straighten it out for us in due time. We just have to keep digging up issues. Meanwhile, a couple of scans below, and more from the Gazette to come.


diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Intl. Notebook Jan 23 2014
SWINGING ADOLF
During World War II anyone could put Hitler on the ropes.

We’ve run across some unusual World War II memorabilia over the years, but this might be the quirkiest item we’ve seen. Pretty much self-explanatory, it’s morale boosting anti Hitler propaganda in the form of a die-cut effigy. He could be used as a bookmark, or a lamp pull, or—in the case of the lucky duck who sold this trinket online for a serious windfall—not used at all so that it would be in A1 condition for the auction market decades later. It was produced by a company in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, and came complete with a tiny piece of rope to make hanging it easy for the buyer. Morbid but amazing.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 5 2014
GESTAPO TACTICS
Conduct unbecoming an officer and a publisher.

Above you see a rare book cover from Australia’s Horwitz Company for Jim Kent’s Gestapo Atrocity, an effort that falls broadly into a category of sleaze fiction (and cinema) sometimes called “nazisploitation.” Kent was prolific in this area, and in the realm of war sleaze in general, writing such evocatively titled books as Butchers of Vilna, Officer’s Love Slaves, Women of Landau, and Women of Stalingrad. He also wrote as Thane Docket and Cleve Banner. The rear cover of Gestapo Atrocity succinctly supplies the set-up, and you can read that below. By the way, we’re kidding about that “conduct unbecoming a publisher” crack in the subhead. We just needed something to put there and that was all we could think of. Horwitz published mounds of World War II fiction, nazisploitation being a subset, and all of it sold well to an eager Aussie public. We don’t think it would sell very well today, but you never know—a competent writer and good marketing can put anything over. Gestapo Atrocity was published in 1971, and the art is by Col Cameron.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Sep 3 2013
SAME OLD STORY
It’s true, Gruppenführer, they don’t seem like fearsome torturers, but wait—they segue into a comedy bit that could make even Churchill beg for death.

Many men’s magazines had a niche, and Man’s Story’s area of specialization was covers depicting Nazis torturing women. Take a quick scan around the internet and you’ll see what we mean. This uncredited effort from September 1963 illustrates Chuck McCarthy’s “Soft Bodies for the Nazis’ Hall of the Living Dead,” and as a bonus the two torturers are a stray from a toga party wearing the latest Nazi bling, and a one-eyed Quasimodo type whose mop of hair must be the envy of the Reichstag. Looking in the background, we can see what fate awaits the beleaguered woman—she’ll be sealed in a glass coffin, drugged, but alive and conveniently accessible when her turn comes for future indignities. As the immortal James Brown sang, “This is a man’s, a man’s, a man’s world, but torture would mean nothing without a woman or a girl.” Or at least that’s what the editors of Man’s Story thought. Scans below, and another example of Nazi torture here.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Intl. Notebook Aug 29 2013
NOW YOU SE IT
They may have looked like a match made in heaven, but their marriage was hell.

Se was founded in 1938 and was Sweden’s first photo magazine, basically repackaging the Life and Look formula. In fact “se” means “look” or “see” in Swedish. During World War II (during which Sweden was neutral) the magazine became a leading voice against Nazism and Swedish Nazi-appeasers. The 1970s saw its circulation dip, and the editorial staff turned toward nude images as a way to maintain market share. The magazine finally closed down in 1981. Se made Marilyn Monroe its cover star numerous times, and the above issue featuring Monroe and her new husband Joe DiMaggio appeared in early 1954. Monroe and DiMaggio had a turbulent marriage, and a short one—274 days after the wedding she filed for divorce on the grounds of mental cruelty. Several sources claim that DiMaggio was violent toward Monroe. We were able to dig up several covers from the years 1954 to 1957, which you see below. We’re interested in this publication and so we’ll try to buy some full issues to share later. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp | Politique Diabolique Aug 19 2013
POLICE REWIND
The National Police Gazette claims Nasser said yessir to fugitive Nazis.


This month in 1961 The National Police Gazette put Adolf Hitler on its cover yet again. We don’t know how many times he appeared there, but this makes the twentieth issue we’ve found and posted. When last we left der Führer he was hiding out in either Argentina or Antarctica, but according to Gazette scribe Harvey Wilson, Hitler was directing his minions as they launched a new Nazi empire in Egypt. Wilson tells readers that Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser’s government was populated by ex-SS officers, that the secret police was being run by Joachim Damling, former head of the Gestapo in Düsseldorf, that there were Egyptian versions of the Hitler Youth, that the economy was being reorganized to a Nazi model, and a vast military machine was being built.

So, is any of this true? Well, many Nazis fled to Egypt at the end of World War II, probably many hundreds, including Aribert Heim, who was known as Dr. Death, and Nazi propagandist Johann Von Leers, who converted to Islam and took a high post at Egypt’s foreign ministry. However, fleeing Nazis ended up settling in many countries, including the U.S. Among those were Otto Von Bolschwing, who in Germany had helped develop a blueprint to purge the country of Jews and later worked for the CIA, and Arthur L. Rudolph, who helped the Nazis build the V-2 rocket and other weapons and eventually ended up being honored by NASA—twice.

In any case, this is an example of what makes tabloids so interesting to us. Some stories—like the one about Hitler living in Antarctica—are patently ridiculous, while others have at least a kernel of truth. The thrust of this story is largely true—Nazis did flee to Egypt, and manywere welcomed by the government. As for the rest of the story—Nasser did indeed reorganize Egypt’s economy and reshape its military sector, but we can’t confirm that it was due to Nazi influence. And we also can’t confirm the claims about Egyptian Hitler Youth and Joachim Damling, but even if parts of the story were wrong, a tabloid doesn’t need many victories to establish credibility in the eyes of its readership—it just needs a few big ones. On that score you have to give the Gazette credit—it said there were Nazis in Egypt and it was right.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Apr 9 2013
LOOKING FOR MR. REICH
The National Police Gazette reminds readers exactly how hard to pin down that Hitler guy is.

No, we’re not done with this guy yet. This Police Gazette cover, which makes the nineteenth we’ve found and posted featuring Adolf Hitler, is from the excellent Scribd.com website and dates from this month in 1953. What is der Führer up to? Well, this time he’s hiding out in the Patagonia region of Argentina along with 75,000 other nazis, all of whom are under the protection of Argentine president Juan Peron. What we love about this story is that it refers back to the Gazette’s infamous Hitler-in-Antarctica issue, pondering: Has the defeated Führer moved his headquarters from the Shangri-La he had established in the Antarctic to the Argentine? Good question. Gazette editors would beat this dead horse for about ten more years, but there was a kernel of truth in it. Juan Peron’s government did take in and protect numerous nazis. Other governments that did the same include that of the United States. However Argentina did it on a massive scale—not 75,000 massive, but still large. About 5,000 nazis settled there. Was Adolf Hitler among them? The National Police Gazette says yes. But we’re not convinced. Guess we’ll just have to wait for whatever new evidence appears in the Gazette’s next, inevitable Hitler issue.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Apr 1 2013
NAZI ROUND-UP

Below, a few scans from Stag of April 1963, with cover art by Mort Kunstler illustrating Emile C. Shurmacher’s story “90 Nazis and 8 Redheads of Radar Island,” and interior spreads from Charles Copeland, Samson Pollen and Walter Popp. See two more issues of Stag here and here.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Feb 1 2013
NOT VIDI CONVINCING
Her last name was Latin for “I saw,” but was her vision about Hitler anywhere close to the truth?


This February 1966 National Police Gazette marks the eighteenth time we’ve found Hitler on the venerable publication’s cover, and this is not the last we’ll see of Der Führer on the Gazette—we have three more that will bring his total to twenty-one, and we’re sure there are others out there. This time around, the world’s greatest medium Madame Luce Vidi has seen Hitler not crisped to a cinder in Berlin, but alive and kicking in the tropics. The Gazette attempts to quell any doubts about Vidi's divinatory prowess by informing readers that she foresaw “the assassination of President Kennedy and had predicted the time of the tragedy, and had also seen the death of French boxer Marcel Cerdan, the former middleweight champion, in a plane crash.

After establishing Vidi’s bona fides, Gazette editors tell us their independent research showed that Hitler escaped Germany aboard a submarine on April 10, 1945, and traveled to a base in Norway where he and a female companion boarded a second sub, laden with millions of dollars in treasure, and sailed for Argentina. Hitler eventually fetched up in the vicinity of San Carlos de Bariloche, where Nazis had years earlier purchased 10,000 acres of land. Vidi describes what Hitler looks like in 1966 (hint: not good—see below). The story ends by claiming he resides in a tropical fortress, where “the aged despot, his heart brimming with hatred and his mind full of the days when his voice shook the world, lives out his time in misery.”

As we’ve pointed out, anyone who thinks conspiracy theories are a new phenomenon needs to read more history. Americans in particular have always given credence to alternate versions of important events, so next time you see someone on television saying Barack Obama was born in Kenya, just remember it’s nothing new. As it turns out though, the town of San Carlos de Bariloche was exposed as a hideout for at least one Nazi when former SS Hauptsturmführer Erich Priebke was found there in 1995. He had been running the local German school. As recently as 2004 claims that Hitler had also lived in the area were aired in an internationally published book, and of course slammed by mainstream historians. But since something like 9,000 former Nazis fled to various parts of South America, we'd be lying if we said we didn't wonder if Hitler couldn't have managed the feat.

Though Luce Vidi supposedly utilized a crystal ball for her Hitler visions, her true specialty was reading ink blots—i.e., she required her clients to throw ink on a surface and she would divine the future from the resultant shapes. We can’t help wondering if she ever divined that she would go from being the “world’s greatest medium” to almost completely forgotten. We doubt it. They never seem to see that coming. We should also note that her vision did not jibe with the beliefs of those who theorized Hitler living near San Carlos de Bariloche. Vidi saw Hitler living in a tropical place—in the background was a turtle dozing on a sandy beach. San Carlos de Bariloche is nestled in the foothills of the Andes, an area where people go to ski, trek and climb. There isn’t a beach anywhere in sight. 

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Vintage Pulp Jan 21 2013
OVER AND OUT
The correct answer is always: “Why yes, I do want to keep on truckin’.

Above is a January 1978 cover for Australia’s Adam, a magazine you know well by now if you frequent this site. The art here illustrates Terry P. Duval’s story “The Final Run,” in which a hapless truck driver picks up what he thinks is a damsel in distress, but who soon shows she’s a pure femme fatale. Adam began in 1946, and this is the magazine near the end—it folded, looks like, in May 1978. Inside this issue you get the usual literary, artistic and photographic treats, including five pages of Patti Clifton shots, plus skiing Nazis, and a profile of the notorious but misunderstood Tokyo Rose, who we wrote about last year. Readers also get to visit a Dakhma, aka Tower of Silence, a Zoroastrian structure where dead bodies—considered in the religion to be unclean—are left to be sun baked and picked apart by scavenging birds, thus preventing putrefaction which would pollute the earth. Mmm. Fun! The author visits a tower near Yazd, Iran, and must have gotten there just before the government shut all such structures down permanently. Today, the only towers still used for ritual exposure are in India. So put those on your travel itinerary. And lastly, on the rear page, you get Paul Hogan in another ad for Winfield cigarettes. Forty-seven scans appear below.

diggfacebookstumbledelicious

Next Page
Featured Pulp
japanese themed aslan cover
cure bootleg by aslan
five aslan fontana sleeves
aslan trio for grand damier
ASLAN Harper Lee cover
ASLAN COVER FOr Dekobra
Four Aslan Covers for Parme
History Rewind
The headlines that mattered yesteryear.
April 16
1943—First LSD Trip Takes Place
Swiss scientist Albert Hofmann, while working at Sandoz Laboratories in Basel, accidentally absorbs lysergic acid diethylamide, better known as LSD, and thus discovers its psychedelic properties. He had first synthesized the substance five years earlier but hadn't been aware of its effects. He goes on to write scores of articles and books about his creation.
April 15
1912—The Titanic Sinks
Two and a half hours after striking an iceberg in the North Atlantic Ocean on its maiden voyage, the British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks, dragging 1,517 people to their deaths. The number of dead amount to more than fifty percent of the passengers, due mainly to the fact the liner was not equipped with enough lifeboats.
1947—Robinson Breaks Color Line
African-American baseball player Jackie Robinson officially breaks Major League Baseball's color line when he debuts for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Several dark skinned men had played professional baseball around the beginning of the twentieth century, but Robinson was the first to overcome the official segregation policy called—ironically, in retrospect—the "gentleman's agreement".
April 14
1935—Dust Storm Strikes U.S.
Exacerbated by a long drought combined with poor soil conservation techniques that caused excessive soil erosion on farmlands, a huge dust storm known as Black Sunday rages across Texas, Oklahoma, and several other states, literally turning day to night and redistributing an estimated 300,000 tons of topsoil.

Advertise Here
Reader Pulp
It's easy. We have an uploader that makes it a snap. Use it to submit your art, text, header, and subhead. Your post can be funny, serious, or anything in between, as long as it's vintage pulp. You'll get a byline and experience the fleeting pride of free authorship. We'll edit your post for typos, but the rest is up to you. Click here to give us your best shot.

Pulp Covers
Pulp art from around the web
microbrewreviews.blogspot.com.es/2014/03/favorites-pulp-covers-gg-ficklings.html trivialitas.piranho.de/coverart/gourdona.htm
www.papy-dulaut.com/10-categorie-10641566.html thepassingtramp.blogspot.com/2014/04/woman-trouble-glance-at-da-blurbs-hard.html
ripjaggerdojo.blogspot.com/2014/03/reform-school-art.html jef-de-wulf.blogspot.com/2009/12/essai-2.html
Pulp Advertising
Things you'd love to buy but can't anymore
PulpInternational.com Vintage Ads
Humor Blog Directory
About Email Legal RSS RSS Tabloid Femmes Fatales Hollywoodland Intl. Notebook Mondo Bizarro Musiquarium Politique Diabolique Sex Files Sportswire